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The KBA Advocate is the weekly KBA legislative newsletter that contains up-to-date information on legislation that impacts your practice. It is only published when the legislature is in session and is sent to all KBA members electronically via the KBA Weekly.

 

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Top tags: Author: Joseph N. Molina III  2019 Session  2019-20  legislature  budget  election  Brownback  Supreme Court  Judicial Branch  school finance  Court of Appeals  Gannon  Hard 50  Kansas Supreme Court  Special Session  2016 Session  2017 session  2017-18  Alleyne  Fall Legislative Conference  merit selection  SCR 1610  Senate  Sine Die  State of the Judiciary  2019 Golf Tournament  2020 legislative session  abortion  Caleb Stegall  conference 

20 Weeks Until the 2020 Session

Posted By Joseph N. Molina III, Tuesday, August 27, 2019
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The 2020 Session is approaching quickly. Summer break has ended, and Kansas lawmakers are attending Interim Committees. These committees will focus on a variety of issues such as criminal justice reform, retail electrical rates, and KanCare Oversight. However, bigger issues are on the horizon.

The legislature will look at several proposals in 2020 that may end up on the election ballot.

Merit Selection will be debated in 2020 ,with its opponents hoping to get a constitutional amendment on the ballot. There is currently a proposal in the Kansas Senate, SCR 1610, that would change Article 3 from a merit selection process to a governor appoint/senate confirm model. This is the process used for the Kansas Court of Appeals—the same process used this past session by Gov. Kelly that has renewed the debate on judicial selection. While SCR 1610 is on the table, it may not end up being the proposal championed by opponents of merit selection. The Kansas Legislature will hold interim committee meetings this fall to get the ball rolling. The KBA has a long-standing policy supporting merit selection for Kansas Appellate Courts.

Also, look for a debate on abortion in 2020.  The Kansas Supreme Court ruled this past April that the Kansas Constitution protects a women’s right to an abortion. In a 6-1 ruling the court held that the constitution protects all Kansans’ natural right to personal autonomy. This ruling has re-invigorated anti-abortion groups who would like to see this outcome changed at the polls through a constitutional amendment. See; https://www.cnn.com/2019/04/26/politics/kansas-supreme-court-abortion-ruling/index.html; See also; https://www.kansas.com/news/politics-government/article229693509.html

We may also see a debate on whether the legislature may impose limits on the amount of money a person can receive for non-economic injuries. This debate is also spurred by a Kansas Supreme Court ruling in the past year. The ruling, Hilburn v. Enerpipe Ltd, dealt with a car accident. The Court found that the state’s non-economic damages cap of $325,000 violated the plaintiff’s right to have a jury determine compensation owed the injured. See; https://www.kansascity.com/news/state/kansas/article231561483.html

Supporters of a statutory cap would also like to see the constitution changed to allow the legislature to limit the amounts recovered for non-economic injury.

These are very large issues to tackle in an election year. They are wide ranging, with a multitude of interested parties—sometimes overlapping interest groups—that will require significant study over a relatively short period of time. How many amendments make it to the ballot remains to be seen, but it it sets the stage for an interesting 90 days in 2020.

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Tags:  2020 Legislative Session  abortion  Author: Joseph N. Molina III  Hilburn v. Enerpipe  merit selection  noneconomic damages  noneconomic injury cap  SCR 1610 

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Big Push for First Adjournment

Posted By Joseph N. Molina III, Tuesday, February 24, 2015

This week the action was in the House Judiciary Committee where judicial selection resolutions were passed out favorably. These bills include the following:

Both bills passed on 13-9 votes and are now headed to the House floor. Timing is the issue now. The first major deadline for the session is turnaround on Friday, February 27. All bills not passed out of their house of origin are dead after this date; this does not include concurrent resolutions. It is likely that leadership will use this week to pass bills that would die if left till after the deadline then run the judicial selection bills.

However, the session is a fluid place and things change rapidly. If either of these resolutions comes up for debate, the KBA will mobilize our membership on short order. For those that are interested, please keep an eye out for a "Call to Action” email to be sent via a "KBA Alert.” This email will include links to both resolutions, links to legislators contact information, a sample email to use and talking points if anyone wishes to personally call their representative.

In addition, the KBA testified on SB 197, which makes the Supreme Court Nominating Commission (SCNC) a public body subject to the open records act.

Judge Karen Arnold-Burger, KSAJ, and KADC also opposed this bill. Sen. King believes that SB 197 is a technical fix that expands the transparency of the SCNC. He believes that issues can be fixed with simple changes and that no constitutional issues exist. You can find the KBA testimony online. This bill should be worked in short order.

The separation of powers issue is also very present in the recently filed lawsuit Solomon v. Kansas. Here Judge Solomon claims that last year’s judicial budget omnibus bill is unconstitutional. The lawsuit also claims that the omnibus bill was retaliation for the school finance ruling. Judge Solomon is represented by Pedro Irogonegaray

The Solomon case may very well bleed over into the Judicial Budget for FY 16/17. The subcommittee on agency budgets held a hearing on the judicial branch budget on Thursday, February 19. The judiciary presented a budget requesting an additional $8.5 million. This would be for operations in FY 16. The judicial branch explained that without these added funds the court would be forced to furlough. It is up to the legislature to fund this request or allow the courts to add additional surcharges. How this plays out remains to be seen.

Also, please visit www.ksbar.org to find any bills of interest in the KBA Bill Tracking Chart.

Tags:  2015 Session  budget  judicial branch  legislators  legislature  merit selection  Supreme Court 

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2013 Legislature Opens

Posted By Joseph N. Molina III, Tuesday, January 15, 2013
Updated: Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Kansas legislators returned to work this week, and they were greeted with a school finance ruling, hearings on merit selection of appellate judges, and 18 other prefilled bills. The most discussed issue is the school finance ruling that ordered the legislature to fund school base aid at a much higher level. See http://www.shawneecourt.org/CivicAlerts.aspx?AID=21.

 

A number of legislators have already voiced their concern over the ruling, believing that the three-Judge panel overstepped their authority by ordering an appropriation of funds. Legislators have stated that the authority to allocated funds is reserved for elected representatives. See http://www2.ljworld.com/weblogs/first-bell/2013/jan/13/school-finance-and-the-kansas-constituti/.

 

The school finance ruling will have a definite impact on the state budget but the ripple effects are sure influences other issues, i.e., merit selection. The Senate and House judiciary committees have already scheduled hearings to discuss changes to the current merit selection method. The Senate has even pre-filled a concurrent resolution to amend the Kansas Constitution (SCR 1601) and another bill (SB 8) to create the Judicial Qualification Commission as an alternative to the Supreme Court Nominating Commission. Hearings are scheduled as follows:

 

Senate Judiciary Committee
Wednesday, January 16 – Thursday, January 17
State Capitol, Rm. 346-S (Old Supreme Court Room)
10:30 a.m. – Noon

 

House Judiciary Committee
Wednesday, January 16 – Thursday, January 17
State Capitol, Rm. 112-N
3:30 p.m.

 

Attorneys practicing in the business entity field should pay attention the following:

SB 5 and HB 2010, dealing with business entities restricting use of acquired entity’s name. Both of these bills contain the same language. The KBA is monitoring this issue.

 

Criminal attorneys may wish to review the following bill:

SB 4 and HB 2008 both concern the statute of limitations for certain sexually violent offenses. These bills would expand the time limit for sexually violent offenses committed against a person under the age of 18.

Tags:  finance  merit selection  opening  school finance 

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