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June 12, 2020 Digests

Posted By Administration, Monday, June 15, 2020

Kansas Supreme Court

 

criminal 

attorneys and clients—criminal procedure—motions—sentencing
state v. adams
sedgwick district court—affirmed
no. 120,475—june 12, 2020

FACTS: District court allowed Adams to dismiss his appointed attorney and to proceed pro se at trial, resulting in plea agreement for guilty plea to criminal charges including premeditated first-degree murder. His request for reappointment of attorney for sentencing was granted. Sentence was imposed, which included a hard 50 sentence, following the plea agreement. Adams later filed motion to withdraw plea stating he was prepared to offer evidence from Iowa and Kansas departments of corrections of his unmedicated schizophrenia to show his plea was involuntary. He also filed K.S.A. 60-1507 motion alleging appointed counsel was ineffective because he did not address at sentencing whether Adams had an unmedicated mental health diagnosis, or have Adams undergo a mental health evaluation. District court held preliminary hearing with new appointed counsel and denied both motions. Adams appealed.

ISSUES: (1) Post-sentence motion to withdraw plea; (2) ineffective assistance of counsel at sentencing

HELD: District court properly concluded there was no manifest injustice because even if Adams had been allowed to present evidence regarding his previous mental health status, that diagnosis was not dispositive and the overall record would still conclusively show he was entitled to no relief.

            Under totality of circumstances, appointed counsel’s decision to forego a mental health evaluation of Adams does not constitute deficient representation when record shows Adams was sufficiently engaged in a rational, thoughtful, knowing way throughout the proceeding. There were no red flags in the record to suggest appointed counsel should have investigated Adams’s mental health. Adams’s reliance on “duty to investigate” in State v. Orr, 262 Kan. 312 (1997), is misplaced.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2019 Supp. 22-3210(d)(2); K.S.A. 22-3301(1), 60-1507

criminal law—criminal procedure—evidence—statutes
state v. dinkel
saline district court—remanded with directions; court of appeals—reversed
no. 113,705—june 12, 2020

FACTS: Jury convicted a school counselor of two counts of rape of 13-yr-old boy (K.H.). Dinkel appealed on claims related to her defense that the K.H. had raped and then blackmailed her into continuing sexual encounters. Dinkel argued the district court’s exclusion of this evidence violated evidentiary rules and her constitutional right to present a defense. Court of appeals affirmed in unpublished opinion, concluding the rape of a child has no mental culpability requirement thus Dinkel’s intent was irrelevant. Review granted.

ISSUE: K.S.A. 2012 Supp. 21-5503(a)(3) - Evidence relevant to voluntary act requirement

HELD: Court of Appeals erred in concluding that whether K.H. forced the sexual encounter was irrelevant. As defined in K.S.A. 2012 Supp. 21-5503(a)(3), rape of a child under age 14 requires a voluntary act on the part of the defendant. Dinkel’s claim that she was forcibly raped is relevant since the rape of Dinkel negates the voluntary act requirement of rape of a child under 14. Jurisdiction retained while case is remanded to district court for Van Cleave hearing to determine whether defense trial counsel was ineffective for failing to argue the State never established the voluntary act requirement.  

STATUTE: K.S.A. 2012 Supp. 21-5201, -5202, -5202(a), -5202(b), -5202(h), -5202(d), -5203(b), -5501(a), -5503(a)(3)

constitutional law—criminal procedure—preemption—statutes
state v. Garcia
johnson district court—affirmed; court of appeals—affirmed
no. 112,502—june 12, 2020

FACTS: Kansas Supreme Court reversed Garcia’s jury conviction for identity theft, holding prosecution based on the use of his W-4 form was preempted by the Immigration and Reform and Control Act (IRCA). State v. Garcia, 306 Kan. 1113 (2017). State filed writ of certiorari in this and companion cases. United States Supreme Court reversed and remanded the state supreme court’s judgment, holding state law prosecutions were not preempted by the IRCA.

ISSUE: PreemptionImmigration Reform and Control Act of 1986

HELD: Consistent with Kansas v. Garcia, 589 U.S. __ (2020), a Kansas prosecution for identity theft or making false information based on information a defendant provides on employment forms, with the exception of the I-9 form, is not preempted by the IRCA. Review of whether there was sufficient evidence of intent to defraud, and whether district court’s failure to give unanimity instruction was clearly erroneous, was improvidently granted. These issues are not addressed on the merits.

STATUTES: 8 U.S.C. § 1324a(b)(5); K.S.A. 2012 Supp. 21-6107

constitutional law—evidence—motions
state v. Glover
douglas district court—reversed; court of appeals—affirmed
no. 116,446—june 12, 2020

FACTS: District court granted Glover’s motion to suppress evidence obtained during a traffic stop, finding the officer lacked reasonable suspicion of illegal activity when he stopped the truck in violation of Fourth Amendment. Court of Appeals reversed. State v. Glover,  54 Kan. App. 2d 377 (2017). Kansas Supreme Court reversed and affirmed the district court’s suppression ruling. 308 Kan. 590 (2018). State’s writ of certiorari granted.

ISSUE: Fourth Amendmenttraffic stop

HELD: Consistent with Kansas v. Glover, 589 U.S. __ (2020), an investigative traffic stop made after running a vehicle’s license plate and learning the registered owner’s driver’s license has been revoked is reasonable under the Fourth Amendment if the officer lacks information negating an inference that the owner is driving the vehicle. Here, the stipulated facts reveal no information known by the deputy sufficient to rebut that reasonable inference. Kansas Supreme Court’s judgment is vacated and case is remanded to district court for further proceedings.

STATUTES: None

constitutional law—criminal procedure—preemption—statutes
state v. morales
johnson district court—affirmed; court of appeals—affirmed
no. 111,904—june 12 2020

FACTS: Kansas Supreme Court reversed Morales’ convictions for identity theft and making a false information, holding prosecution based on use of a Social Security number belonging to another person for employment was preempted by the Immigration and Reform and Control Act (IRCA). State v. Morales, 306 Kan. 1100 (2017). State filed writ of certiorari in this and companion cases. United States Supreme Court reversed and remanded the state supreme court’s judgment, holding state law prosecutions were not preempted by the IRCA.

ISSUE: PreemptionImmigration Reform and Control Act of 1986

HELD: Consistent with Kansas v. Garcia, 589 U.S. __ (2020), a Kansas prosecution for identity theft or making false information based on information a defendant provides on employment forms, with the exception of the I-9 form, is not preempted by the IRCA. Review of whether there was sufficient evidence of intent to defraud was improvidently granted. This issue is not addressed on the merits.

STATUTE: 8 U.S.C. § 1324a(b)(5)

criminal procedure—restitution—sentencing
state v. tucker
wyandotte district court—reversed
no. 119,242—june 12, 2020

FACTS: Tucker pled guilty to one count of capital murder and was sentenced to prison for life without parole. District court ordered payment of $5,000 in restitution without an explicit order for payment during Tucker’s incarceration, and acknowledged that restitution will never be paid. Tucker appealed.

ISSUE: Restitutionunworkable plan

HELD: Under circumstances in this case, district court abused its discretion by ordering an indigent criminal defendant sentenced to life in prison without possibility of parole to pay restitution even while recognizing the restitution would not be paid. State v. Holt, 305 Kan. 839 (2017), State v. Shank, 304 Kan. 89 (2016), and State v. Alcala,  301 Kan. 832 (2015), are distinguished. Restitution is the rule, and unworkability is the exception. Here, Tucker met the burden of establishing that the restitution plan was unworkable. Restitution order is reversed.

STATUTE: K.S.A. 2015 Supp. 21-6604(b)(1)

 

Kansas Court of Appeals

Civil

ADMINISTRATIVE LAW—JURISDICTION
BRUNGARDT V. KANSAS DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE
FINNEY DISTRICT COURT—REVERSED AND REMANDED
NO. 120,409—JUNE 12, 2020

FACTS: Corporal Kerley arrested Brungardt for driving under the influence. Corporal Kerley administered a breath test, following the mandatory procedures for the Intoxilyzer 9000 machine. The machine allows officers to fill out the required forms—including the DC-27 certification form—electronically. Because his blood-alcohol level exceeded legal limits, Brungardt's driver's license was administratively suspended by the Kansas Department of Revenue. In requesting an administrative hearing, Brungardt claimed, among other things, that the DC-27 form was invalid because it lacked an original, non-electronic signature. Although the hearing officer affirmed his suspension, the district court reversed during judicial review. The court found no flaws in Corporal Kerley's performance but ruled that Corporal Kerley had physically signed the machine when he created his electronic signature profile, before Brungardt's test was performed. K.S.A. 8-1002(b) establishes that certification of the DC-27 form occurs upon signing, and the district court reasoned that Corporal Kerley signed a blank page when he established his signature profile. The department appealed.

ISSUES: (1) Jurisdiction; (2) validity of electronic signature

HELD: Brungardt's petition for judicial review included his claim that the DC-27 form was invalid. Even though he didn't argue the exact grounds relied on by the district court when overturning the suspension, Brungardt gave adequate notice that the validity of the DC-27 was in question. This gave the district court jurisdiction to rule. "Signing" encompasses more activity than merely writing a name, and Kansas law recognizes electronic signatures. It is the intent of signing, not the physical form, which controls the effectiveness of the signature. Corporal Kerley followed the procedures of K.S.A. 8-1002(b) and affixed his signature when done. The district court improperly interpreted the statute and erred by reversing the suspension of Brungardt's driver's license.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2019 Supp. 8-1001, -1002(a), -1002(b), -1002(f); K.S.A. 77-614(b)(6)

Criminal

EQUAL PROTECTION—SEX CRIMES
STATE V. LITTLE
SEDGWICK DISTRICT COURT—AFFIRMED
NO. 120,214—JUNE 12, 2020

FACTS: Little was convicted of multiple, high-level felonies, including rape and aggravated criminal sodomy. These convictions meant that on top of his prison sentence, Little was given a lifetime term of postrelease supervision. Little appealed, arguing that this lifetime term of postrelease violated his right to equal protection.

ISSUE: (1) Equal protection

HELD: Equal protection requires that similarly situated people be treated alike. Little compares his postrelease term to the shorter terms given to people who are convicted of other serious felonies, like murder. But sex offenders are not similarly situated to people convicted of murder. Individuals convicted of certain sex offenses have much higher rates of recidivism, and the lifetime term of postrelease supervision serves the dual purpose of allowing rehabilitation while also protecting the public from future offenses.

STATUTE: K.S.A. 2008 Supp. 22-3717(d)(1)(G)

Tags:  administrative law  Attorneys and Clients  Constitutional Law  criminal law  criminal procedure  equal protection  evidence  jurisdiction  motions  preemption  restitution  sentencing  sex crimes  statutes 

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April 3, 2020 Digests

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, April 7, 2020

Kansas Supreme Court

ATTORNEY DISCIPLINE

ORDER OF REINSTATEMENT
IN RE ROSIE M. QUINN
NO. 119,148—APRIL 3, 2020

FACTS: In 2018, Quinn's license to practice law in Kansas was indefinitely suspended. She filed a petition for reinstatement in 2019, and a hearing panel heard her application for reinstatement. After that hearing, the panel unanimously recommended Quinn's reinstatement, subject to certain conditions.

HELD: The court agrees with the hearing panel and grants the petition for reinstatement. Prior to her return to active practice, Quinn must comply with annual CLE requirements and pay all fees. Quinn's practice must be supervised for two years, and she must enter a monitoring agreement with the Kansas Lawyers Assistance Program.

Civil

ADMINISTRATIVE LAW—UTILITIES
IN RE JOINT APPLICATION OF WESTAR ENERGY AND
KANSAS GAS AND ELECTRIC CO
KANSAS CORPORATION COMMISSION—COURT OF APPEALS IS REVERSED, KCC IS REVERSED, CASE REMANDED
NO. 120,436—APRIL 3, 2020

FACTS: In 2018, Westar and Kansas Gas sought a rate increase and certain changes in residential rate design. When considering the rate design, the companies had to address a two-part rate, involving both a flat service charge and a variable energy charge based on the amount of energy used during a billing period. Some of the utilities' fixed costs are recovered through the variable energy charge. Some of the utilities' customers are attached to the electric grid but also get power through an alternative source, such as solar or wind. These customers, known as "partial requirements customers", use less generated electricity and may have zero due for variable energy charges. This creates an issue for the utility, which has the same fixed costs regardless of how much energy is purchased. In an attempt to attempt to even the ledger, the utilities received approval for a new rate structure, applicable only for partial users. Some of the parties to the agreement objected to the rate structure meant only for partial users. After that rate structure was approved, two intervenors appealed to the Court of Appeals.

ISSUE: (1) Whether the rate structure approved by the KCC is allowable

HELD: Kansas statute bars a utility from establishing higher rates or charges for any customer who uses alternative energy. Under the proposed dual-rate system, partial users will pay more for electricity than other customers. The Court of Appeals erred when it found a conflict in our statutes. The utilities are allowed to use a different rate structure for partial use customers, but that structure cannot result in price discrimination.

STATUTES: 16 U.S.C. §796 (17)(A); K.S.A. 66-117d, -118a(b), -118c, -1265(e), 77-621(c)(4)

criminal

criminal procedure—motions—sentences—statutes
state v. coleman
sedgwick district court—affirmed; court of appeals—affirmed
no. 115,293—april 3, 2020

FACTS: Coleman convicted in 2012, 2013, and 2014. In 2015 she was convicted of two counts of theft that were committed weeks after the effective date of the 2015 amendment of  K.S.A. 21-6810 in the Kansas Sentencing Guidelines Act (KSGA). Probation revoked in Coleman’s three prior cases. Coleman challenged the legality of her sentences in those three prior cases, and filed a direct appeal from the 2015 sentence. District court denied relief on all claims. Court of Appeals affirmed in unpublished opinion. In consolidated appeal, review granted on common issue of whether district court erred in scoring Coleman’s prior 1992 Kansas involuntary manslaughter conviction as a person felony.

ISSUES: (1) Classification of prior Kansas conviction—direct appeal; (2) classification of prior Kansas conviction—probation revocation

HELD: The identical-or-narrower test adopted in State v. Wetrich, 307 Kan. 552 (2018), for classifying prior out-of-state convictions applies as well to in-state Kansas convictions for crimes committed before KSGA used person and nonperson designations. Coleman’s arguments that the 1992 involuntary manslaughter statute was broader than the statute making involuntary manslaughter a person offense at the time of her 2015 theft convictions are examined and rejected. District court properly scored the 1992 conviction as a person felony when sentencing Coleman’s 2015 theft convictions.

            Coleman may not file a motion to correct an illegal sentence based on a constitutional challenge, and her 1992 conviction was properly scored in the earlier sentences. Court does not resolve whether the identical-or-narrower test, or the judicially adopted comparability rule for pre-KSGA Kansas offenses in State v. Keel, 302 Kan. 560 (2015), is applicable when pre-KSGA Kansas offenses are used to sentence crimes committed before K.S.A. 2015 Supp. 21-6810 codified the comparability requirement. 

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 21-6801 et seq., -6804(a), -6810, -6811(e)(3); K.S.A. 2015 Supp. 21- 6810; K.S.A. 2014 Supp. 21-6810(d)(2); K.S.A. 2013 Supp. 21-5801(b)(6); K.S.A. 2011 Supp. 21-5202(j), -5405, -5801(b)(6); K.S.A. 20-3018(b), 21-3201(c), 60-2101(b); K.S.A. 21-3201, -3201(c), -3404 (Ensley 1988)

 

Kansas Court of Appeals

Civil

SUBROGATION—WORKERS COMPENSATION
HAWKINS V. SOUTHWEST KANSAS CO-OP SERVICE
WORKERS COMPENSATION BOARD—REVERSED AND REMANDED
NO. 118,379—APRIL 3, 2020

FACTS: Hawkins suffered catastrophic injuries while working for Southwest Kansas Co-op; his injuries require on-going care. Southwest Kansas Co-op provided workers compensation benefits to Hawkins in excess of $850,000, with the expectation that payments would continue. Hawkins also filed a civil action against other parties who he believed contributed to the accident and his resulting injuries. Southwest Kansas Co-op chose not to intervene in this civil action. Hawkins either settled or received jury verdicts against multiple defendants, resulting in an award of over $4 million. After all proceedings were complete, Southwest Kansas Co-op filed a request in the workers compensation proceeding for a determination of its statutory subrogation lien and any credit for future benefits. An ALJ worked up a mathematical formula to determine how much credit Southwest Kansas Co-op should receive. Three members of the Workers Compensation Board of Appeals agreed with the ALJ and affirmed the result. Hawkins appealed the Board's decision and Southwest Kansas Co-op cross-appealed.

ISSUE: (1) Amount of subrogation award for Southwest Kansas Co-op

HELD: K.S.A. 44-504 does not anticipate liens and credits for employers based on third-party litigation with multiple settlements and verdicts. It is undisputed that Southwest Kansas Co-op is entitled to some lien and future credit, but the statute is unclear as to exactly how much. A jury found that the co-op was 25 percent at fault for Hawkins's injuries. Southwest Kansas Co-op's subrogation amount should have been decreased by an amount acknowledging their 25 percent fault. The terms of a settlement agreement between Hawkins and other parties make it difficult to calculate the amount of any subrogation lien. When recalculating the subrogation amount, the Board must consider each annual payment as a recovery actually paid.

STATUTE: K.S.A. 44-504, -504(b), -504(d), 60-258a

 

Tags:  administrative law  Attorney discipline  criminal procedure  KCC  motions  sentences  statutes  subrogation  utilities  workers comp 

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November 21, 2018 Digests

Posted By Administration, Monday, November 26, 2018

Kansas Supreme Court

Attorney Discipline

ORDER OF INDEFINITE SUSPENSION
IN THE MATTER OF ROSIE M. QUINN
NO. 119,148—NOVEMBER 21, 2018

FACTS: Quinn was found to be in violation of KRPC 8.4(b) (committing a criminal act that reflects adversely on the lawyer's honesty or fitness). She was convicted of multiple federal felonies after failing to pay income taxes. Quinn's law license was temporarily suspended after she self-reported the convictions. While that disciplinary proceeding was pending, Quinn asked to have her status changed to disability inactive status. That request was granted, with the understanding that Quinn was required to obtain an independent mental health evaluation. Quinn failed to obtain that evaluation and as a result, her license was transferred back to a temporary suspension.

HEARING PANEL: The hearing panel noted Quinn's history of discipline and the nature of her convictions. The panel also cited Quinn's mental health issues and reputation in her community as mitigating factors. The disciplinary administrator's office recommended that Quinn be indefinitely suspended with the suspension made retroactive to three years prior to the date of the final hearing report. The hearing panel noted that Quinn presented compelling evidence of rehabilitation and relied heavily on the mitigating evidence in recommending that Quinn's license be suspended for three years, with that suspension made retroactive to October 5, 2011. The hearing panel believed that Quinn should be eligible for reinstatement without further proceedings.

HELD: The court adopted the hearing panel's findings and conclusions. The only question for the court to consider is whether Quinn should be required to undergo a reinstatement hearing before being allowed to return to practice. A majority of the court held that Quinn should be indefinitely suspended with an effective date of October 2011. Before being reinstated, Quinn must complete various tasks including a bar exam review course and continuing legal education hours. A minority of the court would have disbarred Quinn.

Civil

ADMINISTRATIVE LAW—TENURE
HARSAY V. UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS
DOUGLAS DISTRICT COURT—Affirmed
COURT OF APPEALS—REVERSED
NO. 114,292—NOVEMBER 21, 2018

FACTS: The University of Kansas hired Harsay to a tenure-track position in 2004. She began the tenure review process in 2009. Peer reviewers were hesitant to give unqualified recommendations for tenure; there were concerns about insufficient scholarship activities leading to an inability to secure funding. Nevertheless, the department-level committee recommended that Harsay receive tenure. The College Committee disagreed and voted to reject Harsay's application. That decision was ratified by the University Committee. Harsay appealed to the university but the chancellor upheld the decision to deny tenure. Harsay filed a timely petition for judicial review, but it was dismissed for failure to prosecute. Using the savings statute, Harsay refiled the action. The district court denied on the merits Harsay's challenge to the university's decision. The court of appeals reversed, noting inaccuracies in the College Committee's report and expressing concerns about the adequacy of the university's factual findings. The university's petition for review was granted.

ISSUES: (1) Savings statute; (2) substantial evidence

HELD: Provisions of the Code of Civil Procedure can apply to actions taken under the KJRA. And the plain language of K.S.A. 60-518 allows it to apply to any action. Although the reports of various tenure committees were short on details and contained errors, there is adequate support in the record as a whole for the ultimate decision to deny tenure to Harsay.

CONCURRENCE (Goering, D.J. assigned): There is substantial evidence in the record as a whole to support the university's decision on Harsay's tenure application. But the panel erred by finding that K.S.A. 60-518 can apply to cases brought under the KJRA.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2017 Supp. 77-613, -621(c)(4), -621(c)(7), -621(c)(8), -621(d); K.S.A. 60-518

Criminal

constitutional law—criminal law—Fourth Amendment—statutes
state v. Evans
dickinson district court—affirmed and remanded
No. 119,458—November 21, 2018

FACTS: An officer conducted a warrantless search of Evans’ purse and wallet after an ambulance took Evans from auto accident scene. Evans was arrested and charged with drug offenses after officer found methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia in zippered pocket of the wallet. Evans filed motion to suppress, alleging the search violated the Fourth Amendment. State argued the warrantless search was valid under the plain-view exception and the officer’s administrative caretaking function of locating Evan’s driver’s license to complete an accident report. District court disagreed and granted the motion to suppress. State filed interlocutory appeal.

ISSUES: (1) Warrantless search—community caretaking function, (2) warrantless search— duty to complete accident report

HELD: District court’s judgment was affirmed. The caretaking role of law enforcement does not itself constitute an exception to the warrant requirement. Both Cady v. Dombrowski, 413 U.S. 433 (1973), and South Dakota v. Opperman, 428 U.S. 364 (1976), support caretaking/ inventory searches conducted under standard police procedures. Here, no evidence established the standard procedures of the police or county sheriff’s office. Accordingly, Dombrowski, Opperman and related cases do not support State’s contention that the search of Evan’s purse and wallet fits a well-delineated exception to the warrant requirement.

State v. Canaan, 265 Kan. 835 (1998), which relied on plain view and inventory search exceptions to the warrant requirement, did not create a new exception allowing a search simply because officers have a duty to complete the accident report. State failed to meet burden of establishing the inventory exception, and under facts in this case the drug evidence was not in plain view. Nor did the circumstances present an exigency or an emergency that required immediate verification of Evans’ identity or give rise to the emergency doctrine exception. Kansas statutes allow drivers a reasonable time to produce their own driver’s license, and legislature did not impose a duty on officers that would justify invading privacy guaranteed by Fourth Amendment.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2017 Supp. 8-1604, -1611, -1611(a), -1611(a)(2), -1612, -1612(a), -1612(b), 22-3603; K.S.A. 8-244, 20-3018(c)

criminal law—criminal procedure—evidence—
jury instructions—prosecutors—statutes
state v. haygood
wyandotte district court—affirmed
No. 115,591—november 21, 2018

FACTS: A jury convicted Haygood of premeditated first-degree murder and criminal possession of a firearm. On appeal he claimed error in the admission of his long-term girlfriend’s testimony about prior domestic violence, and the denial of his request for jury instructions on the affirmative defense of self-defense and the lesser-included offense of involuntary manslaughter. Haygood also claimed the prosecutor, in closing argument, misstated the facts or law, argued facts not in evidence, commented on witness credibility, and attempted to shift the burden of guilty to the defendant.

ISSUES: (1) Admission of K.S.A. 60-455 evidence, (2) prosecutorial error in closing argument, (3) instructions on self-defense and involuntary manslaughter

HELD: Three-part test in State v. Gunby, 282 Kan. 39 (2006), is stated and applied, finding the trial court did not err in admitting the prior domestic violence evidence to show motive.

Prosecutor’s comments and arguments contained facts that were either placed in evidence or that were reasonably inferred from trial evidence. Although some statements were inarticulately phrased, prosecutor did not misstate the law. No burden-shifting was implied from State’s closing argument, and no merit to claim that prosecutor impermissibly accused Haygood of lying.

In light of K.S.A. 2017Supp. 21-5108(c), as amended in 2010, Haygood was entitled to an instruction on self-defense affirmative defense because his testimony was competent evidence that could allow a reasonable juror to conclude he was entitled to defend with deadly force. District court erred by denying Haygood’s request for an instruction on self-defense, but the error was harmless in this case. Likewise, even if an involuntary manslaughter lesser included offense instruction is assumed to be factually appropriate, the failure to give a lesser included offense instruction was harmless error.

CONCURRENCE (Rosen, J.)(joined by Nuss, C.J. and Stegall, J.): Concurs with the result but departs from majority’s reasoning regarding the self-defense instruction. Disagrees that a defendant’s solitary declaration that he or she committed a crime in self-defense will always satisfy the competent evidence standard described in K.S.A. 2017 Supp. 21-5108(c). Also disagrees with majority’s suggestion that the 2010 statutory provision meaningfully impacts this analysis. Under facts in this case, no rational fact-finder could reasonably conclude that Haygood acted in self-defense. Would find no error in trial court’s denial of a self-defense instruction.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2017 Supp. 21-5108(c), -5222, -5405(a)(4); K.S.A. 21-5108

criminal procedure—jury instructions—statutes
state v. pulliam
wyandotte district court—affirmed
court of appeals—affirmed
No. 113,493—November 21, 12018

FACTS: Pulliam was convicted of voluntary manslaughter (of Eisdorfer), second-degree murder (of Burton), and criminal possession of a firearm. He appealed, claiming in part the jury should have been instructed on a theory of imperfect self-defense involuntary manslaughter as a lesser included crime for the charge of second-degree murder. Court of appeals affirmed, holding such an instruction was not factually appropriate because State v. Houston, 289 Kan. 252 (2009), required an unintentional killing for involuntary manslaughter, and there was no evidence Pulliam’s killing of Burton was unintentional. Pulliam’s petition for review granted on this one issue.

ISSUE: Jury instruction on lesser included offense of imperfect self-defense involuntary manslaughter

HELD: Court of appeals’ decision is affirmed, but on a different rationale. Pulliam’s jury instruction claim was reviewed for clear error in this case. Court of appeals’ decision relied on outdated law because Houston was based on an earlier version of the crime defining statute. The amended involuntary manslaughter statute and a new culpable mental states statute, K.S.A. 2017 Supp. 21-5202, govern this case. Conviction of involuntary manslaughter under an imperfect self-defense manslaughter theory pursuant to K.S.A. 2017 Supp. 21-5405(a)(4) does not require proof of a reckless or unintentional killing. On evidence in this case, a lesser included offense instruction on the imperfect self-defense form of involuntary manslaughter was legally and factually appropriate. District court erred in not giving it, but no clear error found. Pulliam’s second-degree murder conviction is affirmed.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2017 Supp. 21-5109(b)(1), -5202(a)-(j), -5203(b), -5402(a)(2), -5405(a)(1)-(4), 22-3414(3); K.S.A. 21-3201, -3201(b)-(c), -3404(c), -3761(a)(2)

Tags:  administrative law  Attorney Discipline  constitutional law  Dickinson District  Douglas District  evidence  fourth amendment  jury instructions  statutes  tenure  Wyandotte District 

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May 5, 2017, Appellate Court Digests

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, May 9, 2017
Updated: Monday, September 10, 2018

Kansas Supreme Court

CIVIL

ADMINISTRATIVE LAW—CIVIL PROCEDURE
BOARD OF COUNTY COMM'RS V. KANSAS RACING & GAMING COMM'N
SHAWNEE DISTRICT COURT—AFFIRMED
NO. 115,978—MAY 5, 2017

FACTS: Castle Rock Casino Resort, LLC and the Board of County Commissioners of Cherokee County filed this action after the Kansas Lottery Commission selected Kansas Crossing Casino, LLC to manage a state-owned and operated casino in Southeast Kansas. The Lottery Commission rejected Castle Rock's proposal and suggested the state would be better served by a smaller casino in Crawford County, primarily because Castle Rock's proposed site was directly across the state line from a large casino in Oklahoma. After the Lottery Commission made its selection, the Kansas Racing and Gaming Commission received many public comments, many of which disagreed with the Lottery Commission's choice. After a public hearing, the KRGC voted unanimously to approve Kansas Crossing's proposed facility. Cherokee County sought review in district court, as did Castle rock. The district court denied the requests for relief, finding that the decision to select Kansas Crossing was not arbitrary, capricious, or unreasonable in light of the Southeast Kansas market. The motion to alter or amend was denied.

ISSUES: (1) Was the scope of discovery appropriate; (2) was there error when ruling on the motion to amend the petitions; (3) was there error in refusing to allow an evidentiary hearing; (4) did the KRGC misapply the lottery act by failing to make required findings; (5) was the KRGC's decision supported by sufficient evidence

HELD: The scope of discovery was within the trial court's discretion and it was unclear whether traditional discovery was available in proceedings under the KJRA. It did not matter in this case, though, since the district court disallowed discovery because the requested discovery did not relate to issues raised in the petition for judicial review. Because Appellants did not brief the issue of whether amended petitions would have prejudiced the defendants, the district court was affirmed on that issue. The request for an evidentiary hearing was a duplicative renewed motion for discovery that was properly denied. The KRGC has broad discretion to decide which gaming contract is best for the state. The statute does not specifically require findings of fact. The record as a whole shows substantial evidence to support the choice of Kansas Crossing.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2016 Supp. 74-8702(f)(2), -8734(b), -8734(g), -8734(h) -8735, -8735(a), -8735(h), -8736(b), -8736(e), -8737, 77-603(a), -614(b), -614(c), -621(a), -621(c), -621(d); K.S.A. 2015 Supp. 74-8736(b), 77-621(c); K.S.A. 2007 Supp. 74-8702(f), -8734(a); K.S.A. 77-606, -619(a)

 CRIMINAL

criminal law—sentences
state v. reese
sedgwick district court—affirmed
court of appeals—affirmed
no. 110,021—may 5, 2017

FACTS: Reese convicted of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. The sentencing court applied recent amendments to Kansas Offender Registration Act (KORA) making Reese’s use of deadly weapon a person felony, and lengthening the time violent offenders are required to register. Reese filed post-judgment motions to challenge the retroactivity of the KORA amendments. District court ruled that it lost subject matter jurisdiction once the sentencing order became final. Reese appealed, arguing the district court possessed jurisdiction to consider his challenge as a motion to correct an illegal sentence. In unpublished opinion, Court of Appeals cited cases that rejected a similar argument, and dismissed the appeal for lack of jurisdiction. Reese’s petition for review granted.

ISSUE: Motion to Correct Illegal Sentence - Constitutional Claim

HELD: Lower courts had jurisdiction to hear and consider Reese’s motions to correct an illegal sentence, but Reese’s claim is premised on allegations of constitutional deficiencies. As in State v. Dickey, 305 Kan. 217 (2016), Reese advanced no meritorious argument demonstrating his sentence is illegal, so his claim fails on the merits. Judgments below are affirmed as right for the wrong reason.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2016 Supp. 22-4902(e)(2), -4906(a)(1); K.S.A. 22-3504, -3504(1), -4901 et seq.

 

criminal law—sentences
 state v. Wood
sedgwick district court—affirmed; court of appeals—affirmed
no. 111,243—may 5, 2017

FACTS: Wood was convicted in 2003 of attempted indecent liberties with a child. Sentence imposed included certification of Wood as a sex offender with duty to register. Kansas Offender Registration Act (KORA) was amended in 2011 to increase registration period from 10 to 25 years. Woods filed motion challenging the retroactive application of the 2011 amendments. District court ruled it lacked jurisdiction to consider Wood’s constitutional claims. Wood appealed, arguing the district court possessed jurisdiction to consider his challenge as a motion to correct an illegal sentence. In unpublished opinion, Court of Appeals cited cases that rejected a similar argument, and dismissed the appeal for lack of jurisdiction. Wood’s petition for review granted.

ISSUE: Motion to correct illegal sentence—Constitutional claim

HELD: Lower courts had jurisdiction to hear and consider Wood’s motions to correct an illegal sentence, but Wood’s claim was premised on allegations of constitutional deficiencies. As in State v. Dickey, 305 Kan. 217 (2016), Wood advanced no meritorious argument demonstrating his sentence was illegal, so his claim failed on the merits. Judgments below were affirmed as right for the wrong reason.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2011 Supp. 22-4906(b)(1)(E); K.S.A. 2002 Supp. 22-4902(c)(2), -4906(b); K.S.A. 22-3504, -3504(1), -4901 et seq.

 

constitutional law—criminal law—search and seizure
state v. zwickl
reno district court—reversed and remanded
court of appeals—affirmed
no. 113,362—may 5, 2017

FACTS: Officers executed a warrant for search of Zwickl’s car and discovered pounds of marijuana. This led to issuance of a search warrant for Zickl’s residence where more drug evidence was discovered. State charged Zwickl with possession of marijuana with intent to sell and other related offenses. He filed motion to suppress, alleging the affidavit supporting the vehicle search warrant provided insufficient evidence to find probable cause for issuing the warrant. District court granted the motion, finding it entirely unreasonable for an officer to believe the vehicle search warrant was valid. State filed interlocutory appeal. In unpublished opinion, Court of Appeals reversed, finding sufficient indicia of probable cause for officers to reasonably rely in good faith on the warrant. Zwickl’s petition for review was granted.

ISSUE: Good-faith exception—probable cause determination

HELD: Applying Leon good-faith exception to exclusionary rule, adopted in State v. Hoeck, 284 Kan. 441 (2007), the details in the affidavit supporting the vehicle search warrant were examined, including the Colorado surveillance of Zwickl. That affidavit contained sufficient indicia of probable cause such that an officer’s reliance on the warrant was not entirely unreasonable. Panel’s decision was affirmed. District court’s suppression of the evidence was reversed and case was remanded.

STATUTE: K.S.A. 60-2101(b)

Tags:  administrative law  civil procedure  constitutional law  Reno District  search and seizure  Sedgwick District  Shawnee District 

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