Print Page | Contact Us | Sign In | Register
Appellate Court Digests
Blog Home All Blogs
@@WEBSITE_ID@@

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: Attorney Discipline  Sedgwick District  Wyandotte District  Shawnee District  constitutional law  Johnson District  Reno District  Saline District  Sedgwick  8807  statutes  Douglas District  Johnson  criminal procedure  Disbarment  evidence  Finney District  Fourth Amendment  Johnson District Court  Leavenworth District  Motions  Reno  Riley  search and seizure  Sedgwick District Court  Shawnee  Shawnee District Court  Wyandotte  Ellis District Court  Geary District 

November 8, 2019 Digests

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Kansas Court of Appeals

 

criminal

constitutional law—criminal procedure—motions—trials —statutes
state v. HAMMERSCHMIDT
Ellis District Court—reversed and remanded
no. 120,016—november 8, 2019

FACTS: Hammerschmidt was charged with a misdemeanor DUI. He filed motion to suppress evidence from the stop, arguing he was not given proper notices before the breath test. He also referenced two pending decisions awaiting rehearing in Kansas Supreme Court. District court granted continuances on its own initiative, citing the pending rehearing decisions. 607 days after a motion to suppress was filed, and 360 days after State v. Nece, 306 Kan. 679 (2017) (Nece II), and State v. Ryce, 306 Kan. 682 (2017) (Ryce II), the district court denied the motion to suppress. Hammerschmidt filed motion to dismiss, alleging violation of speedy trial statute. District court granted that motion and dismissed the complaint. State appealed, arguing in part that K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 22-3402(g) bars dismissal.

ISSUE: Speedy trial statute

HELD: District court erred by dismissing the case on statutory speedy trial grounds. Hammerschmidt first requested delay in the case by filing motion to suppress, and that delay was originally attributable to him. Because the matter was taken under advisement for an unreasonable amount of time and because it was unclear if Hammerschmidt consented to the delay, district court later attributed the delay to the State. Although the delay here was several hundred days, the legislature removed the remedy of dismissal when a district court later attributes delays to the State that were originally attributable to a defendant. K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 22-3402(g). Hammerschmidt did not argue that prosecutorial misconduct precipitated the lengthy delay or that application of K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 22-3402(g) violated his constitutional speedy trial rights, and his statutory speedy trial claim is based on circumstances which expressly forbid dismissal on statutory speedy trial grounds.

STATUTE: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 22-3402, -3402(b), -3402(g)

constitutional law - criminal procedure - evidence - fourth amendment - motions
state v. fisher
Sedgwick District Court—affirmed
no. 120,031—november 8, 2019

FACTS: Officers entered the house in response to a 911 call report that someone in the house had been shot. No injured person was found, but officers discovered Fisher with drugs in plain view. Fisher was charged with drug offenses. He filed a motion to suppress, claiming the officers lacked a lawful justification to enter the house because they failed to first ask the two women standing outside the house any clarifying questions or whether they were injured. District court denied the motion, finding the clearing of the house to find if someone was hurt or dying was not unreasonable under the circumstances. Fisher was convicted in bench trial on stipulated facts. He filed timely appeal.

ISSUE: Emergency aid exception to warrantless search

HELD: District court did not err in denying the motion to suppress. The emergency aid exception test stated in State v. Neighbors, 299 Kan. 234 (2014), is applied, but an Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals case is identified as more factually similar to the present case. Officers had authority under the emergency aid exception to act until assured that no one needed assistance. The mere presence of people outside the house where gunshots were reported did not remove the officer’s reasonable basis to search the house for victims. The possibility of someone suffering from a gunshot wound inside necessitated an immediate search.

STATUTES: None

criminal procedure—sentences—statutes
state v. wilmore
shawnee district court—affirmed
no. 120,171—november 8, 2019

FACTS: Wilmore was convicted of two counts of indecent liberties with a child. On appeal, he claimed the district court imposed an illegal sentence in calculating criminal history by using two prior domestic battery cases that had been used in an earlier case to elevate the classification of a third domestic battering conviction to a felony.

ISSUE: Sentencing—criminal history calculation of prior domestic battery charges

HELD: Wilmore’s “double-counting” challenge is rejected for same reasons stated in numerous unpublished court of appeals decisions. District court did not violate K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 21-6810(d) in calculating Wilmore’s criminal history score. Wilmore’s alternative interpretation of the statute is unreasonable. Under court’s longstanding interpretation of K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 21-6819(d), the unambiguous statutory language does not prohibit a district court from aggregating prior domestic battery person misdemeanors to create a person felony for criminal history purposes even when those same domestic battery convictions were used in an earlier case to elevate a domestic battery charge from a misdemeanor to a felony.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 21-5414(c)(1)(C), -6810(d)(10), -6811(a), 22-3504(1)
K.S.A. 2015 Supp. 21-6810(d)(9)

Tags:  Constitutional Law  criminal procedure  Ellis District Court  evidence  Fourth Amendment  motions  Sedgwick District Court  sentences  Shawnee District Court  statutes  trials 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

November 1, 2019 Digests

Posted By Administration, Monday, November 4, 2019

Kansas Supreme Court

 

Civil

JURISDICTION—WORKERS COMPENSATION
VIA CHRISTI HOSPITALS V. KAN-PAK, LLC
WORKERS COMPENSATION BOARD—COURT OF APPEALS IS REVERSED,
WORKERS COMPENSATION BOARD IS AFFIRMED
NO. 116,692—NOVEMBER 1, 2019
 

FACTS: Darin Pinion was severely burned while working at Kan-Pak. Via Christi provided medical care; his total bills exceeded $1 million. Kan-Pak's workers compensation insurance was provided by Travelers, who contracted with Paradigm to coordinate complicated cases. Paradigm paid only $136,451.60 of Pinion's considerable bill, under the 2011 Schedule of Medical Fees. For the 2011 Maximum Fee Schedule, language was added which allowed insurers to pay the lesser of the 70 percent stop loss calculation or the MS-DRG formula. It is unknown how the "lesser of" language ended up in the statute, as no one from the agency claimed knowledge of the addition. Via Christi requested reimbursement of 70% of Pinion's total bill. An ALJ found that the language in the regulation controlled and that it was without authority to ignore the "lesser of" language. The Board agreed and Via Christi appealed. The Court of Appeals reasoned that if no one at the agency knew that the "lesser of" language was added, that change was not properly promulgated and was ineffective. The Court of Appeals was unwilling to enforce an accidental rule, believing the outcome would be arbitrary and capricious. Paradigm's petition for review was granted.

ISSUES: (1) Jurisdiction, (2) effectiveness of the 2011 regulation

HELD: Jurisdiction exists to hear the merits of the case. The director of workers compensation is ultimately responsible for preparing the fee schedule. He is not a party to this action and the faulty rulemaking was not raised as a cause of action. The issue of rulemaking by the directoraccidental or otherwisewas never properly before the Board on appeal from the hearing officer. These proceedings were initiated as a fee dispute under a narrowly-drawn statute. It was not arbitrary or capricious to follow a plainly-worded regulation and enforce it as written.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 44-510i, -510j, 77-603(a), -614, -614(b), -614(c), -621(c), -621(c)(8); K.S.A. 44-556, 77-602(j), -606

 

criminal

constitutional law—criminal procedure—juveniles—speedy trial
state v. owens
sedgwick district court—affirmed; court of appeals—affirmed
No. 115,441—november 1, 2019

FACTS: 17-year-old Owens charged with juvenile offenses related to stealing a car at gunpoint. Six months later, the juvenile case was dismissed and Owens was charged with aggravated robbery, criminal use of a weapon and criminal deprivation of property. Jury convicted him as charged in trial that began some 19 months after his arrest. Owens appealed, claiming in part the delay between his arrest and trial violated his constitutional right to a speedy trial. Court of appeals affirmed in an unpublished opinion, finding right to speedy trial attached upon filing of the adult criminal charges, and the 13-month delay from that point until Owens’ trial was presumptively prejudicial. Review granted on Owens’ speedy trial claim that the delay was 19 rather than 13 months, and on State’s cross-petition alleging the panel erred in finding the length of delay presumptively prejudicial.

ISSUE: (1) Speedy trial

HELD: The federal and state constitutional right to a speedy trial applies to juvenile offender proceedings under the Revised Kansas Juvenile Justice Code, citing State v. Robinson, 56 Kan. App. 2d 567 (2018)(filed after briefs submitted in present case). Thus the delay in bringing Owens to trial was more than 19 months. Factors in Barker v. Wingo, 407 U.S. 514 (1972), are applied, finding no violation of Owens’ constitutional speedy trial rights. A presumption of prejudice arose from the length of a delay that was excessive given the relative simplicity of the case, but reasons for the delay weigh against Owens under facts in this case. While he complained about the delay, evidence supports that he wanted his attorney to seek consolidation of his cases and that these efforts resulted in some delay. And Owens made no showing he was prejudiced by the delay. Judgment of court of appeals affirming the district court is affirmed.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 22-3402(g), 38-2301 et seq., K.S.A. 2012 Supp. 22-3208(7); K.S.A. 20-3018(b)

 

Kansas Court of Appeals

criminal

constitutional law—criminal procedure—discovery—evidence—sanctions
state v. auman
douglas district court—affirmed
No. 120,438—november 1, 2019

FACTS: While turning left with sun in his eyes, Auman hit a motorcyclist he had not seen. State charged him with aggravated battery while driving under the influence of alcohol and prescribed medications, and made repeated requests to police department for evidence. On Friday before Monday trial that was scheduled at the last date within speedy trial statute, dashcam videos were obtained and disclosed to the defense. In part, Auman filed motion to dismiss, arguing Brady violation because videos were produced too late to investigate three identified witnesses at the scene and comments between two officers that would tend to show the sun’s glare, not intoxication, caused the collision. Given State’s delay in providing information and video’s potential exculpatory value, compounded by the speedy trial issue, district court dismissed the criminal case. State appealed, claiming the district court abused its discretion in taking such drastic action.

ISSUE: Duty to disclose evidence favorable to the defense

HELD: District court’s dismissal of the case is affirmed. Due Process Clause does not force a defendant to bear burden of a lack of cooperation between prosecutor and law enforcement, which in this case resulted in the eleventh-hour disclosure of potentially exculpatory information that was within State’s possession since Auman’s collision. State could have waited to file case until it received all discovery information from law enforcement, or—through cooperative efforts of prosecutors and law enforcement—could have arranged for all discovery to be provided within time frame ordered by district court.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 8-1567(a), 21-5107(d), - 5413(b)(3)(A), 22-3212(i); K.S.A. 2015 Supp. 21-5413(b)(3)(A)

Tags:  constitutional law  criminal procedure  discovery  Douglas County Court  evidence  jurisdiction  juveniles  sanctions  Sedgwick District Court  speedy trial  Workers Compensation  Workers Compensation Board 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

October 25, 2019 Digests

Posted By Administration, Monday, October 28, 2019

Kansas Supreme Court

 

Civil

DAMAGES—PRODUCTS LIABILITY
CORVIAS MILITARY LIVING, LLC V. VENTAMATIC, LTD. AND JAKEL, INC.
GEARY DISTRICT COURT—COURT OF APPEALS IS AFFIRMED IN PART AND REVERSED IN PART
DISTRICT COURT IS AFFIRMED IN PART AND REVERSED IN PART, REMANDED WITH DIRECTIONS
NO. 116,307—OCTOBER 25, 2019

FACTS: Corvias is a construction firm specializing in military housing. Corvias built thousands of units near Fort Riley. In these homes, it installed bathroom ceiling fans manufactured by Ventamatic, Ltd. and Jakel Motors, Inc. After installation, several fans caught fire and damaged homes. Corvias not only incurred damage with fire remediation, it also needed to replace all of the fans in other units, so it filed suit. The district court granted summary judgment to both defendants, finding that the suit was unquestionably a products liability claim governed by the Kansas Product Liability Act. The court ruled that all of Corvias' claims for damages was barred by the economic loss doctrine. The Court of Appeals reversed the grant of summary judgment on the issue of fire damage, finding that the fans were not an integral part of the house as a whole. But the panel did not address whether Corvias had an implied warranty claim covering whether the fans were inherently dangerous. Both defendants filed a petition for review, which was granted.

ISSUE:  (1) Recovery under the KPLA

HELD: The KPLA covers all product liability causes of action. That Act included liability for "damage to property", which shows that the Legislature intended to allow recovery for damage to any property, even the product itself. The Kansas economic loss doctrine does not preclude recovery for property damage within a product liability cause of action. Corvias' costs for fan replacement are undisputedly economic losses, and therefore not compensable under the KPLA. But the KPLA does not subsume all other legally viable causes of action for loss recovery. Corvias brought an action for unjust enrichment. The record is insufficient to show whether that claim can succeed, so the case is remanded.

STATUTE: K.S.A. 60-3302(c), -3302(d), -3302(d)(1)

 

Criminal

CRIMINAL THREAT—CONSTITUTION
STATE V. BOETTGER
DOUGLAS DISTRICT COURT—COURT OF APPEALS IS REVERSED, DISTRICT COURT IS REVERSED
NO. 115,387—OCTOBER 25, 2019
 

FACTS: One evening, Boettger was visiting with the employees of a convenience store. He was lamenting the fact that he had found his daughter's dog in a ditch after it had been shot. Boettger was upset that the sheriff's department would not investigate. Boettger told one employee that if he found the perpetrator they "might find themselves dead in a ditch somewhere." The employee who heard the remarks knew Boettger and his speaking style and was not concerned. Another employee, who knew Boettger very well, was closely related to a detective with the sheriff's department. Boettger, who was visibly angry, approached this man and said that he would "end up finding [his] dad in a ditch." The employee was concerned and ultimately called the police to report the incident. Boettger denied any intent to threaten or cause harm, but he was still convicted of one count of reckless criminal threat. Boettger appealed, but the Court of Appeals confirmed his convictions. Boettger's petition for review was granted.

ISSUE: (1) Whether K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 21-5415(a)(1) is unconstitutionally overbroad

HELD: Some tension can arise when the government attempts to criminalize true threats. An important inquiry centers on the speaker's intent to intimidate and cause fear. In order to be constitutional, the statute must require more than a purpose to communicate just threatening words. Instead, it must also require that the speaker wants the recipient to believe that the speaker intends to act violently—an intent to intimidate or convey a threat. K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 21-5415, which allows an individual to be punished for reckless conduct, potentially criminalizes protected speech and is facially overbroad. Boettger's conviction under that statute must be reversed.

STATUTES: U.S. Const. amend. I; K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 21-5415(a)(1)

 

FIRST-DEGREE MURDER—JURY INSTRUCTIONS
STATE V. DEAN
SEDGWICK DISTRICT COURT—AFFIRMED
NO. 116,568—OCTOBER 25, 2019

FACTS: Dean was accused of firing his weapon while at a crowded party in revenge for the death of his fellow gang member. After the shooting was over, Dean was charged with one count of premeditated murder, four counts of aggravated battery and one count of criminal possession of a firearm. During deliberations, the presiding juror brought in a personal notebook which contained notes that were taken outside of the trial. The district court dismissed this juror and questioned the rest of the panel, all of whom denied taking notes or seeing notes from another juror. As he was leaving, the removed panel member gave a partially completed verdict form to the bailiff. It is unknown what the form said, but after seeing it defense counsel moved for a mistrial, which was denied. Dean was convicted as charged. He appeals.

ISSUES: (1) Necessity of a mistrial, (2) cautionary instruction, (3) motion for new trial, (4) evidence of premeditation, (5) admissibility of evidence of gang affiliation

HELD: Because the partially completed verdict form is not in the record on appeal, there is no way to know its impact on the jury. Dean had the burden to designate a record adequate to show error. In that absence, he is not entitled to relief. A district court is not legally required to instruct the jury to view with caution the testimony of a noninformant witness who is potentially benefitting from the testimony. Defendant's cross-examination showed the witness' potential bias to the jury. The district court did not err by finding that evidence regarding the cooperating witness' arrangement was neither newly discovered nor material. And Dean's failure to provide the new evidence in the record on appeal precludes review. Premeditation involves forming the intent to kill beforehand. In this case, the State presented sufficient evidence of premeditation. The gang affiliation evidence presented at trial was relevant and not unduly prejudicial, especially in light of the mitigating instruction given by the district court.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 22-3412(c), -3501(l); K.S.A. 22-3423(1)(c), 60-401(b)

 

CRIMINAL THREAT—CONSTITUTION
STATE V. JOHNSON
MONTGOMERY DISTRICT COURT—COURT OF APPEALS IS REVERSED DISTRICT
COURT IS REVERSED, CASE REMANDED
NO. 116,453—OCTOBER 25, 2019

FACTS: Johnson's mother contacted law enforcement with claims that Johnson was abusing her. A deputy responded to her home and noticed signs of a struggle, but Johnson was not at the residence. A return visit occurred the next day after Johnson's mother claimed that he made statements in which he threatened to either harm or kill her. Johnson was charged with one count of criminal threat—for allegedly tearing a telephone off of the wall and threatening to burn down his mother's home and kill her. At trial, both Johnson's mother and wife testified that within their family it was common to threaten to kill each other, but that they never actually meant it. Johnson was also injured and in pain, causing frequent angry outbursts. A jury convicted Johnson of criminal threat. He appealed, and the Court of Appeals affirmed his conviction and Johnson's petition for review was granted.

ISSUES: (1) Sufficiency of the evidence, (2) constitutionality of K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 21-5415(a)(1)

HELD: The State charged Johnson with either intentionally or recklessly making a criminal threat. The jury was instructed on both mental states but was not asked to specify under which state Johnson was convicted. But the State presented sufficient evidence to convict Johnson under either theory. The government can only regulate "true threats." The "reckless disregard" provision of K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 21-5415(a)(1) encompasses more than true threats and thus potentially punishes constitutionally protected speech. It is unconstitutionally overbroad. Even though Johnson was potentially convicted for intentional behavior, the unconstitutionality of the reckless disregard provision is prejudicial enough that Johnson's conviction must be reversed.

DISSENT: (Stegall, J.) The majority is correct that K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 21-5415(a)(1) is unconstitutionally overbroad. But the error is not prejudicial under a modified harmlessness analysis, and his conviction should be affirmed.

STATUTE: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 21-5202(c), -5415(a)(1)

Tags:  constitution  criminal threat  damages  Douglas District Court  first degree murder  Geary District Court  jury instructions  Montgomery District Court  product liability  Sedgwick District Court 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

October 11, 2019 Digests

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Kansas Supreme Court

Civil

DUTY—IMMUNITY—LAW ENFORCEMENT
WILLIAMS V. C-U-OUT BAIL BONDS
JOHNSON DISTRICT COURT—COURT OF APPEALS IS REVERSED,
DISTRICT COURT IS REVERSED—CASE REMANDED
NO. 116,883—OCTOBER 11, 2019

FACTS: Agents from C-U-Out Bail Bonds came to the Williamses' home in search of the Williamses' daughter-in-law. Mrs. Williams told the agents that the woman they sought was not in her home. It was late at night, Williams was caring for her elderly and ill mother, and she denied the agents' request to enter the home. The agents attempted to enter the home by force, and Williams called the police. After the police arrived, agents forced their way into the home. The police officers on scene stood and watched and refused to assist Williams. The Williamses sued both C-U-Out and also the City of Overland Park, claiming the officers committed the tort of "negligent failure to protect." The district court granted the City's motion to dismiss, finding that the City was immune from liability under the Kansas Tort Claims Act and also finding that the City owed no duty to the Williamses. The Court of Appeals agreed that the City owed no duty to the Williamses. The panel also held that the City was immune under the discretionary function exception. The Kansas Supreme Court granted review.

ISSUES: (1) Sufficiency of facts to support illegal conduct, (2) existence of a duty, (3) discretionary function immunity

HELD:  The issue of whether C-U-Out's agents acted lawfully was, in part, a factual question. The Court of Appeals erred by disregarding factual allegations made in the Williamses' petition. Generally, law enforcement owes a duty only to the public at large. To succeed here, the Williamses had to prove that the City owed them a duty because of a special relationship or a specific circumstance. Although the existence of a duty is a question of law, where a duty is predicated on an affirmative act, there is a threshold factual question of whether the defendant's behavior could have triggered a duty. The district court erred by granting the motion to dismiss because of a lack of duty. The question of whether discretionary function immunity exists is high contextual. The district court erred by granting a motion to dismiss on these grounds.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 60-212(b)(6), 75-6104, -6104(e); K.S.A. 22-2809

 

Kansas Court of Appeals

CIVIL

JURY MISCONDUCT
KING V. CASEY'S GENERAL STORES, INC.
RICE DISTRICT COURT—AFFIRMED
NO. 120,241—OCTOBER 11, 2019

FACTS: King was injured after he slipped on some ice in a Casey's parking lot. He filed suit and the parties attempted to settle; when that was unsuccessful, the case proceeded to trial. During voir dire, panel member J.W. was asked whether he had any personal knowledge that would cause a problem for him if he was seated on the jury. J.W. said that he knew one of the witnesses—a Casey's employee—but said that wouldn't make him unable to be impartial when deciding the case. Another potential juror, R.W., was removed from the jury panel via peremptory strike because he knew King's family. The day after voir dire concluded, R.W. contacted King's attorney to tell her that one of the potential jurors told the panel that Casey's had offered to settle and that King should have accepted the offer. Further questioning revealed that the juror who brought up the settlement was J.W. King moved for a mistrial based on juror misconduct. After J.W. was questioned, the district court denied the motion but it did remove J.W. from the jury panel. The jury continued with 11 members and ultimately returned a verdict finding no fault by either party. King moved for a new trial based on juror misconduct, which was denied. King appealed.

ISSUE: (1) Whether J.W. tainted the jury

HELD: In most civil cases, a person asserting juror misconduct has the burden to prove that the misconduct occurred and that prejudice resulted. In this case, there was a factual dispute regarding how much J.W. knew about settlement proceedings and how extensively he shared that knowledge with other jurors. J.W.'s failure to volunteer information did not amount to prejudicial misconduct.

STATUTE: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 60-259(a)

 

DUTY—NEGLIGENCE
MORGAN V. HEALING HANDS HOME HEALTH CARE, LLC
SEDGWICK DISTRICT COURT—REVERSED AND REMANDED
NO. 119,147—OCTOBER 11, 2019

FACTS: Morgan's son, Robert Cook, had "chronic, severe" paranoid schizophrenia and diabetes. His schizophrenia made him forgetful, which meant he had trouble remembering to take his medication. His doctors prescribed twice-daily home healthcare visits. Cook's health aides were supposed to evaluate his status, set up medications and remind Cook to take his pills, monitor his blood sugar, and draw labs as needed. Beginning in May of 2013, nurses noted that Cook's apartment was very warm. Some of Cook's medications made him unable to tolerate heat. The nurses counseled Cook on the temperature in his apartment and on his personal hygiene. Cook was unable or unwilling to follow their requests, and he continued to live in his apartment with no temperature control, resulting in him sweating and being warm. Medical logs noted that Cook's pulse was very rapid. In June 2013, Cook died of hyperthermia. Morgan brought a wrongful death and survival action against Healing Hands, claiming its negligence caused Cook's death. Healing Hands sought and received partial summary judgment on two issues: that it legally had no duty to alert Morgan to Cook's condition, and that Kansas' mandatory reporter statute did not require Healing Hands or its employees to report Cook's condition to law enforcement or state authorities. The remaining issues were tried to a jury, which found in Healing Hands's favor. Morgan appeals.

ISSUES: (1) Duty to warn and mandated reporter, (2) disputed issues of material fact, (3) jury instructions

HELD: The district court read the mandatory reporter statute too broadly. The statute did not require that Cook had previously been adjudicated incompetent or appointed a guardian or conservator before its obligations were triggered. There were fact questions on this issue that should have been heard by a jury. Evidence showed that while Cook lived independently, he required twice-daily nursing care to manage his physical and mental health. The mandatory reporter statutes created a duty of care, and the violation of these statutes may be used to establish a breach of that duty. The district court did not err when instructing the jury.

CONCURRENCE: (Malone, J.) Concurs in the result.

STATUTE: K.S.A. 39-1430(a), -1430(g), -1431, -1431(a), -1431(e), -1432(b)

Tags:  Author: Patti Van Slyke  duty  immunity  Johnson District Court  jury misconduct  law enforcement  negligence  Rice District Court  Sedgwick District Court 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)