Print Page | Contact Us | Sign In | Register
Appellate Court Digests
Blog Home All Blogs
@@WEBSITE_ID@@

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: Attorney Discipline  Sedgwick District  Wyandotte District  Shawnee District  constitutional law  Johnson District  Reno District  Saline District  Sedgwick  8807  statutes  Douglas District  Johnson  criminal procedure  Disbarment  evidence  Finney District  Fourth Amendment  Johnson District Court  Leavenworth District  Motions  Reno  Riley  search and seizure  Sedgwick District Court  Shawnee  Shawnee District Court  Wyandotte  Ellis District Court  Geary District 

November 8, 2019 Digests

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Kansas Court of Appeals

 

criminal

constitutional law—criminal procedure—motions—trials —statutes
state v. HAMMERSCHMIDT
Ellis District Court—reversed and remanded
no. 120,016—november 8, 2019

FACTS: Hammerschmidt was charged with a misdemeanor DUI. He filed motion to suppress evidence from the stop, arguing he was not given proper notices before the breath test. He also referenced two pending decisions awaiting rehearing in Kansas Supreme Court. District court granted continuances on its own initiative, citing the pending rehearing decisions. 607 days after a motion to suppress was filed, and 360 days after State v. Nece, 306 Kan. 679 (2017) (Nece II), and State v. Ryce, 306 Kan. 682 (2017) (Ryce II), the district court denied the motion to suppress. Hammerschmidt filed motion to dismiss, alleging violation of speedy trial statute. District court granted that motion and dismissed the complaint. State appealed, arguing in part that K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 22-3402(g) bars dismissal.

ISSUE: Speedy trial statute

HELD: District court erred by dismissing the case on statutory speedy trial grounds. Hammerschmidt first requested delay in the case by filing motion to suppress, and that delay was originally attributable to him. Because the matter was taken under advisement for an unreasonable amount of time and because it was unclear if Hammerschmidt consented to the delay, district court later attributed the delay to the State. Although the delay here was several hundred days, the legislature removed the remedy of dismissal when a district court later attributes delays to the State that were originally attributable to a defendant. K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 22-3402(g). Hammerschmidt did not argue that prosecutorial misconduct precipitated the lengthy delay or that application of K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 22-3402(g) violated his constitutional speedy trial rights, and his statutory speedy trial claim is based on circumstances which expressly forbid dismissal on statutory speedy trial grounds.

STATUTE: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 22-3402, -3402(b), -3402(g)

constitutional law - criminal procedure - evidence - fourth amendment - motions
state v. fisher
Sedgwick District Court—affirmed
no. 120,031—november 8, 2019

FACTS: Officers entered the house in response to a 911 call report that someone in the house had been shot. No injured person was found, but officers discovered Fisher with drugs in plain view. Fisher was charged with drug offenses. He filed a motion to suppress, claiming the officers lacked a lawful justification to enter the house because they failed to first ask the two women standing outside the house any clarifying questions or whether they were injured. District court denied the motion, finding the clearing of the house to find if someone was hurt or dying was not unreasonable under the circumstances. Fisher was convicted in bench trial on stipulated facts. He filed timely appeal.

ISSUE: Emergency aid exception to warrantless search

HELD: District court did not err in denying the motion to suppress. The emergency aid exception test stated in State v. Neighbors, 299 Kan. 234 (2014), is applied, but an Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals case is identified as more factually similar to the present case. Officers had authority under the emergency aid exception to act until assured that no one needed assistance. The mere presence of people outside the house where gunshots were reported did not remove the officer’s reasonable basis to search the house for victims. The possibility of someone suffering from a gunshot wound inside necessitated an immediate search.

STATUTES: None

criminal procedure—sentences—statutes
state v. wilmore
shawnee district court—affirmed
no. 120,171—november 8, 2019

FACTS: Wilmore was convicted of two counts of indecent liberties with a child. On appeal, he claimed the district court imposed an illegal sentence in calculating criminal history by using two prior domestic battery cases that had been used in an earlier case to elevate the classification of a third domestic battering conviction to a felony.

ISSUE: Sentencing—criminal history calculation of prior domestic battery charges

HELD: Wilmore’s “double-counting” challenge is rejected for same reasons stated in numerous unpublished court of appeals decisions. District court did not violate K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 21-6810(d) in calculating Wilmore’s criminal history score. Wilmore’s alternative interpretation of the statute is unreasonable. Under court’s longstanding interpretation of K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 21-6819(d), the unambiguous statutory language does not prohibit a district court from aggregating prior domestic battery person misdemeanors to create a person felony for criminal history purposes even when those same domestic battery convictions were used in an earlier case to elevate a domestic battery charge from a misdemeanor to a felony.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 21-5414(c)(1)(C), -6810(d)(10), -6811(a), 22-3504(1)
K.S.A. 2015 Supp. 21-6810(d)(9)

Tags:  Constitutional Law  criminal procedure  Ellis District Court  evidence  Fourth Amendment  motions  Sedgwick District Court  sentences  Shawnee District Court  statutes  trials 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

October 18, 2019 Digests

Posted By Administration, Monday, October 21, 2019

Kansas Court of Appeals

Civil

CHILD IN NEED OF CARE
IN RE D.H.
ELLIS DISTRICT COURT—REVERSED AND REMANDED
NO. 121,131—OCTOBER 18, 2019

FACTS: D.H. was born in December 2007. Mother and Father were not married and their relationship ended soon after D.H. was born. When D.H. was an infant, the State alleged that D.H. was a child in need of care. In a companion paternity case, Father's paternity was legally established. Father used that paternity case to seek residency and parenting time decisions for D.H. After a hearing, Father was given primary residency of D.H., with Mother having parenting time once per week. Soon after this hearing, Mother moved out of state. She delivered a son shortly after that, who was later diagnosed with autism. Mother sought and received services for this child, and also sought and received financial and residential stability for herself. For the next six years, Mother spoke on the phone with D.H., but did not actually visit in person. Mother finally had a personal visit with D.H. in 2017. Father died by suicide in 2018. Because of his death, D.H. was placed in protective custody and later sent to live with her paternal grandfather. The State filed a CINC petition. Mother traveled to personally appear at the temporary custody hearing. After hearing evidence, the district court found that D.H. was a CINC because Mother abandoned her. Mother appealed.

ISSUES: (1) Relevant time period; (2) sufficiency of the evidence

HELD: The district court found that Mother abandoned D.H. in 2009, meaning that D.H. was without adequate parental control at the time of the CINC hearing. The plain language of the statute does not require the district court to make its adjudication decision based only on the circumstances that exist on the day of the adjudication hearing. Rather, the district court's decision should be guided by the temporal language used in the relevant statutory subsection that is being considered. There was insufficient evidence presented that D.H. was in need of care.

STATUTE: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 38-2202, -2202(a), -2202(d), -2250, -2251

JURY INSTRUCTIONS—SEXUALLY VIOLENT PREDATORS
IN RE CARE AND TREATMENT OF QUILLEN
JOHNSON DISTRICT COURT—VACATED AND REMANDED
NO. 120,184—OCTOBER 18, 2019

FACTS: Richard Quillen was committed as a sexually violent predator in 2006. As part of his civil commitment, Quillen was entitled to an annual review hearing. In 2013, Quillen asked for a jury trial when he challenged the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services' recommendation that he remain in custody. That request was granted, and after a hearing the jury found that the State met its burden to prove that Quillen did not meet the criteria for transitional release. Quillen sought a new trial, claiming the district court violated his due process rights by failing to instruct the jury on "serious difficulty controlling behavior" as a separate element that the State must prove. The district court denied the motion and Quillen appealed.

ISSUE: (1) Jury instructions

HELD: Quillen questioned whether the elements required to prove a committed person is not safe to be sent to transitional release are the same as those required to initially commit an individual. They are. Despite statutory changes and a consent decree, Quillen correctly notes that the State is constitutionally required to prove that Quillen would have serious difficulty controlling his behavior if transitionally released. The district court erred by not adding that essential element to the jury instructions, and the error was prejudicial. Quillen is entitled to a new trial.

STATUTE: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 59-29a02(a), -29a07(a), -29a08, -29a08(a), -29a08(c), -29a08(d), -29a08(g)

Tags:  CINC  Ellis District Court  Johnson District Court  Sexually violent predators 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

October 4, 2019 Digests

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, October 8, 2019

Kansas Supreme Court

Criminal

Appeals–Appellate Procedure—Constitutional law—evidence—fourth amendment—statutes
State v. Perkins
Ellis District Court—Affirmed
Court of Appeals—Affirmed
No. 112,449—October 4, 2019

FACTS: Perkins arrested for DUI. He filed motion to suppress results of breath test to which he had consented. District court denied the motion and convicted him on stipulated facts. Perkins appealed. Court of Appeals directed State to show cause why the matter should not be summarily reversed per State v. Nece, 303 Kan. 888 (2016)(Nece I), and State v. Nece, 306 Kan. 679 (2017)(Nece II). Reflecting the State’s redirected arguments, panel affirmed district court, finding the search incident to arrest exception to warrant requirement allows a warrantless breath test; and finding the good-faith exception applied in this case because officer acted with objectively reasonable reliance on statute that was later determined to be unconstitutional. State v. Perkins, 55 Kan.App.2d 372 (2018). Perkins’ petition for review granted.

ISSUES: (1) Preservation Exception; (2) Good-Faith Exception; (3) Search Incident to Arrest

HELD: State’s redirected arguments are considered. Panel’s request that State brief new arguments on appeal is akin to panel raising the issue sua sponte, and parties are to be afforded an opportunity to present their positions to the court. Nece is distinguished. 

District court’s refusal to suppress the result of breath test is affirmed. Good-faith exception to exclusionary rule would save evidence in this case even through Perkins’ consent to search was invalid. Case is analogous to State v. Daniel, 291 Kan. 490 (2010). Here, officer followed existing law and could not reasonably be expected to know that K.S.A. 2012 Supp. 8-1025 would later be found unconstitutional. While provisions that criminalized test refusal were unconstitutional, the entire implied consent statutory scheme was not invalidated. 

No need to discuss alternative argument about search incident to arrest exception.

CONCURRENCE (Luckert, J.): Agrees with application of good-faith exception. Also concurs with majority’s implicit application of U.S. Supreme Court caselaw to § 15 of Kansas Constitution Bill of Rights, but questions whether continued application should be in lockstep with federal caselaw. Open to reexamination of Daniel, but not in this case. Application by federal and state courts of Illinois v. Krull, 480 U.S. 340 (1987), warrants reconsideration of whether its exception leaves Kansas without the protection guaranteed by § 15.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2012 Supp. 8-1025, -1567(a)(2), -1567(a)(3), -1567(b)(1)(B); K.S.A. 22-2501(c)

Kansas Court of Appeals

Civil

ADOPTION
IN RE ADOPTION OF C.S.
SHAWNEE DISTRICT COURT—AFFIRMED
NO. 120,359 – OCTOBER 4, 2019

FACTS: Father and Mother started a relationship in early 2017. By spring of that year, Mother was pregnant. At the time, both she and Father were under age 18, although Father turned 18 about five months into the pregnancy. During her pregnancy, Mother spent a great deal of time with Father at his mother's home, where she received food and clothing, but never any monetary support. Mother claims that she spent so much time with Father because he wanted to control her, and there was evidence that Father was verbally abusive. In an effort to get away from him, Mother moved to Florida to live with extended family for the last part of her pregnancy. C.S. was born in December 2017 and moved to live with potential adoptive parents in March 2018. Mother waived her parental rights but Father would not, so the adoptive parents filed a motion seeking to terminate his parental rights for lack of support. The district court granted the motion and Father appealed.

ISSUES: (1) Evaluation of support given Father's age; (2) sufficiency of the evidence

HELD: The obligation to provide support begins at pregnancy, not birth. That support need not be complete but must be of consequence and reasonable under the circumstances. Father was 18 for most of the relevant look-back period where support was required. And there is no statutory distinction between parents who are minors and parents who are legal adults during the relevant time period where support must be provided. Further, Father does not get credit for support that his mother provided to Mother. The district court's decision to terminate Father's parental rights is supported by clear and convincing evidence.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 59-2136(h)(1)(D), -2136(h)(2)(A), -2136(h)(2)(B), -2136(h)(4)

Criminal

Constitutional law - criminal procedure - motions - sentences - statutes
State v. Gales
Edwards District Court—Affirmed
No. 119,302—October 4, 2019

FACTS: Gales convicted of intentional second-degree murder and arson. Sentencing criminal history score included a 1976 California juvenile burglary adjudication that was classified asa person felony. Convictions and sentence affirmed on direct appeal. Gales I (unpublished, rev. denied). Gales filed motion to correct an illegal sentence to challenge classification of the California adjudication. Relying on State v. Dickey, 301 Kan. 1018 (2015)(Dickey I), Court of Appeals vacated Gales’ sentence and remanded to district court to make additional findings under Dickey to determine classification of the California adjudication as a person or nonperson offense. Gales II (unpublished). Thereafter, State v. Dickey, 305 Kan. 217 (2016)(DickeyII) extended Dickey I; State v. Wetrich, 307 Kan. 552 (2018), held that a prior out-of-state crime must have identical or narrower elements that the Kansas offense being compared; and Legislature amended K.S.A. 22-3504. Supplemental briefing ordered. 

ISSUE: (1) Illegal Sentence - Retroactivity and Application of Dickey

HELD: Gales entitled to constitutional rule in Apprendi because his conviction became final after Apprendi was announced. Gales does not get benefit of the identical-or-narrower definition of comparable offenses announced in Wetrich which constituted a change in the law. Under complicated facts in this case, district court’s process for deciding to classify the prior California crime as a person offense violated Apprendi but the decision is affirmed utilizing the classification process set forth in Dickey which does not constitute a change in the law as contemplated by the 2019 amendment to K.S.A. 22-3504.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 22-3504, -3504(c)(amended 2019); K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 21-6811(d), -6811(e)(3); K.S.A. 2015 Supp 21-6811(e)(3); K.S.A. 2000 Supp. 21-4711; K.S.A. 21-3715, -3715(a), -3715(b), -3715(c), -4711(d), -6811(e)(3), 22-3504, -3504(c)

appeals—constitutional law—criminal procedure—trials
State v. Williams
Graham District Court—Reversed and remanded
No. 120,099—October 4, 2019

FACTS: Under a deferred prosecution diversion agreement, State would dismiss felony charges if, in part, Williams paid $490 in costs and fees within one year. After 11 months of nonpayment, State moved to rescind the agreement. District court granted the motion and immediately found Williams guilty as charged based on fact stipulations in the diversion agreement. Williams appealed.

ISSUES: (1) Diversion Agreement; (2) Waiver of Right to Jury Trial

HELD: District court’s revocation of the diversion agreement, based on Williams’ admitted lack of payments, was not error.

Issue is reviewed for first time on appeal to prevent denial of a fundamental right. A district court’s failure to comply with requirement to advise a defendant of right to a jury trial on the record requires reversal and remand. Here, no written waiver and the record does not show the district court ever advised Williams about his right to a jury trial. Reversed and remanded to either afford Williams his constitutional right to a trial by jury based on stipulated facts or to allow him to execute a valid waiver of a jury trial.

STATUTE: K.S.A. 22-2911, -3403(1)

Tags:  Edwards District Court  Ellis District Court  Graham District Court  Shawnee District Court 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)