Print Page | Contact Us | Sign In | Register
Appellate Court Digests
Blog Home All Blogs
@@WEBSITE_ID@@

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: criminal procedure  statutes  constitutional law  Attorney Discipline  evidence  Sedgwick District  Sedgwick District Court  Criminal Law  motions  jury instructions  Appeals  sentencing  Johnson District Court  Shawnee District Court  Wyandotte District  jurisdiction  Shawnee District  juries  Sentences  Fourth Amendment  Johnson District  Reno District  Saline District  Sedgwick  8807  appellate procedure  habeas corpus  Reno District Court  search and seizure  contracts 

May 31, 2019 Digests

Posted By Administration, Monday, June 3, 2019

Kansas Supreme Court

Attorney Discipline

ORDER OF DISBARMENT
IN THE MATTER OF PAMELA J. THOMPSON
NO. 120,818—MAY 31, 2019

FACTS: A hearing panel found that Thompson violated KRPC 1.15 (safekeeping property); 8.4(c) (engaging in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit or misrepresentation); 8.4(d) (engaging in conduct prejudicial to the administration of justice). The allegations arose after Thompson hired Qualified Plan Solutions to provide administrative services for 401(k) retirement accounts for Thompson and her employees. Thompson was the plan's administrator and trustee. Beginning in January 2016, Thompson withheld funds from her paychecks and her employees' paychecks. But except on one occasion, she did not deposit the funds as required by the plan. It was not until February 2017 that Thompson's employees noticed that their 401(k) accounts were underfunded. Thompson worked with QPS to get the accounts current, including both salary deferrals and earned interest. It was alleged that Thompson got the money to make these deposits by converting money from estate cases without being given approval by the court.  

HEARING PANEL: Thompson stipulated to the violations. The hearing panel noted several aggravating factors, including a dishonest or selfish motive and a pattern of misconduct. The misconduct was somewhat mitigated by Thompson's personal and emotional problems, but the panel did not believe that Thompson's stress and anxiety excused the misconduct. The disciplinary administrator recommended that Thompson be disbarred. Thompson asked that discipline be limited to a one-year suspension. A majority of the hearing panel recommended that Thompson be indefinitely suspended.

HELD: Thompson did not file exceptions to the report and the findings were deemed admitted. After considering the facts, the court agreed with the disciplinary administrator and ordered disbarment. The court found that Thompson's misconduct was too serious to justify a lesser sanction.

criminal 

appeals—criminal procedure—motions
state v. douglas
reno district court—reversed and remanded
court of appeals—affirmed
no. 119,170—may 31, 2019

FACTS: During traffic stop, officer observed a capsule sticking out of Douglas’ pants pocket. Capsule then dropped while Douglas exited the car. Capsule was retrieved and tested positive for methamphetamine. Douglas filed motion to suppress, arguing violation of constitutional rights. District court agreed, stating no description of the capsule was provided to the court, thus no basis to find the detention was based on a reasonable and articulable suspicion. State appealed, citing officer’s testimony about the capsule. Court of appeals reversed and remanded with directions to deny the motion to suppress. Dissenting judge agreed to the reversal, but would remand for district judge to reevaluate findings based on evidence the officer in fact described the capsule observed in Douglas’ pocket. Douglas’ petition for review granted.

ISSUE: (1) Ruling on motion to suppress—reversal and remand

HELD: When a district court judge’s ruling in favor of defense motion to suppress is infected with an obviously incorrect assessment of State’s evidence that is equivalent to an arbitrary disregard of a portion of that evidence, an appellate court cannot be certain if the district judge, once the error was pointed out, would arrive at the same or a different conclusion. In such circumstances, wisest course for appellate court is to reverse and give district judge another chance to review the record. Panel majority’s reversal and remand with directions to draw an opposite conclusion of law short-circuits that chance. Reversed and remanded for further proceedings. Panel’s decision is affirmed but its instructions to the district court are modified.

STATUTE: K.S.A. 22-3216(2)

appeals—criminal procedure—restitution—sentences
state v. johnson
montgomery district court—affirmed in part—vacated in part
no. 117,788—may 31, 2019

FACTS: Johnson entered a no contest plea to charges of felony murder, aggravated kidnapping, aggravated assault, and criminal possession of firearm. Sentencing included: inconsistent references as to whether the life sentence for felony murder included possibility of parole after 25 years or required lifetime postrelease supervision; ambiguity about what sentences were to run concurrent or consecutive; and journal entry stating that restitution was “to be determined (TBD).” Johnson appealed on sentencing claims.

ISSUES: (1) Lack of preservation of consecutive sentencing issue; (2) jurisdiction to impose restitution; (3) illegal sentence aspects requiring correction without remand

HELD: Merits of Johnson’s claim—that district court relied on facts outside the record in sentencing consecutive terms on felony murder and aggravated kidnapping convictions—is not considered. Johnson failed to raise this issue in district court, and does not explain why issue should be considered for first time on appeal.

District court’s failure to follow procedure mandated in State v. Hall, 298 Kan. 978 (2014), and State v. Charles, 298 Kan. 993 (2014), deprived district court of jurisdiction to set restitution later. That portion of journal entry and subsequent nunc pro tunc order indicating restitution remains “TBD” is vacated.

State concedes that judge’s inconsistent statements about parole eligibility after 25 years, not lifetime postrelease supervision, made this aspect of Johnson’s sentence illegal. The lifetime postrelease supervision term imposed at sentencing is vacated. Also, on face of record that clearly shows judge’s intention, no further action is required to correct the criminal possession sentence to make it concurrent with the other three sentences.

STATUTE: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 21-6620(b)(1), -6820(i), 22-3504(1), -3504(3), -3717(b)(2)

criminal procedure—jurisdiction—motions—sentences—statutes
state v. smith
sedgwick district court—affirmed
court of appeals—affirmed
No. 113,828—may 31, 2019

FACTS: Smith was convicted in 1984 on a guilty plea to charges of burglary and theft. Jail credit not addressed at sentencing or in final journal entry. No appeal from subsequent revocation of probation in the 1984 case. Smith filed 2014 motion for jail credit for time spent in county jail and residential facility. District court denied the motion, finding any jail credit issue had been waived. Smith appealed, arguing broad interpretation of his pro se motion as one filed under K.S.A. 60-1507, or under K.S.A. 22-3504 citing State v. Guzman, 279 Kan. 812 (2005). Court of appeals affirmed in unpublished opinion. Smith petitioned for review, seeking resolution of conflict in court of appeals’ opinions regarding district court’s jurisdiction to review post-conviction jail credit motions.

ISSUES: (1) Jurisdiction; (2) clerical error

HELD: Smith’s failure to raise issue of jail credit on direct appeal does not foreclose a motion under the nun pro tunc provision in K.S.A. 22-3504(2) to review clerical errors in judgments. The words “at any time” in that subsection means Kansas courts, with some exception, have jurisdiction to determine whether a clerical error occurred even after the time for an appeal has passed. Contrary holdings are disapproved in unpublished panel opinions in this case, State v. Muldrow (No. 107291), State v. Blazier (No. 110070), State v. Olson (No. 102226),  State v. Burnett (No. 112681), State v. Brown (No. 111052), State v. Arculeo (No. 110974), State v. Lakin (No. 111060), State v. Walker (No. 109309), and any other court of appeals decision holding that a criminal defendant cannot move for correction of jail credit if the defendant failed to raise the issue in a direct appeal.

Summary dismissal of Smith’s motion was warranted. Smith requested 18 months of jail credit, but identified no clerical error. Instead, Smith makes conclusory statements, presents no evidentiary support and provides nothing in the record warranting relief.

CONCURRENCE AND DISSENT (Luckert, J.): Agrees that Smith’s failure to raise issue of jail credit on direct appeal did not result in waiver of the issue if relief is sought under K.S.A. 22-3504(2). Disagrees with majority’s conclusion that district court can be affirmed because Smith failed to allege a jurisdictional basis for his motion. Reasons cited for why the merits of Smith’s motion cannot be evaluated at this time, including whether standard for “clerical error” stated in State v. Storer, 53 Kan.App.2d 1 (2016), should be adopted. Would remand to allow parties to develop their procedural, factual and legal arguments about whether a clerical error occurred.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2018 Sup. 21-6615, 22-3504(1), -3504(2), -3717(d)(1), -3717(q); K.S.A. 21-4614, 22-3504(1), -3504(2), 22-3722, 60-1507

Kansas Court of Appeals

Civil

EXHAUSTION OF ADMINISTRATIVE REMEDIES—UNEMPLOYMENT
LUCKETT V. KANSAS EMPLOYMENT SECURITY BOARD OF REVIEW
GEARY DISTRICT COURT—REVERSED AND REMANDED
NO. 119,717—MAY 31, 2019

FACTS: After losing her job, Luckett filed for weekly unemployment insurance benefit claims with the Kansas Department of Labor. Although some of her claims were denied, Luckett was awarded unemployment benefits for a certain period of time. In a letter dated more than 60 days after the last decision was rendered, Luckett sought payment of the benefits that were awarded as well as reconsideration of another decision. The referee who received Luckett's letter construed it as a motion to reconsider and denied it on grounds that it was untimely and failed to establish excusable neglect for a late appeal from a denial. The referee did not address Luckett's claim that she had not yet been paid the benefits that were awarded to her. Luckett again sent a letter clarifying that she wanted to be paid the benefits that she was awarded. Luckett filed a petition for judicial review. The district court ultimately granted KDOL's motion to dismiss, finding that Luckett's appeals were untimely. She appealed.

ISSUES: (1) Correct standard; (2) finding of excusable neglect; (3) motion to amend

HELD: Luckett's appeal was based on the KJRA. For that reason, a summary judgment standard is inappropriate. It is undisputed that Luckett's November 2017 letter was filed beyond the 16-day time limit established by statute. But that letter was not an appeal of an adverse decision. And the examiner's original decision allowed for reconsideration within one year assuming that Luckett provided some necessary information. That was what Luckett was attempting to do. The KDOL erred by construing Luckett's letter as an appeal. Luckett's filings were not untimely, and she was not required to exhaust administrative remedies before receiving relief. Luckett had claims consistent with a mandamus action. It was error to dismiss Luckett's petition for review without considering her motion to amend.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 44-703(d), -709(b)(2), -709(b)(3), -709(i), 60-215(a)(2), 77-603(a), -621(a)(1), -621(c)(4), -621(c)(7), -621(d); K.S.A. 60-

Criminal

criminal procedure—motions—sentences
state v. gonzalez
sedgwick district court—affirmed
no. 119,311—may 31, 2019

FACTS: Gonzalez pleaded guilty to criminal charges in 2012 and was granted probation. In 2013, he violated probation and served an 8-month prison sentence. In 2016, he was ordered to be deported. He filed a 2017 motion to withdraw his plea, arguing his attorney had not explicitly discussed deportation. He then amended his motion to claim excusable neglect for his untimely motion, citing his belief at the time of his plea that he was a lawful permanent resident non-citizen entitled to same protections as a United States citizen. District court denied the motion, finding Gonzalez failed to show excusable neglect.

ISSUE: (1) Post-sentence motion to withdraw plea

HELD: In this case, the acknowledgment of rights and entry of plea form that Gonzalez received during his plea hearing, reviewed with his attorney, understood and signed satisfied the requirements in Padilla v. Kentucky, 559 U.S. 356 (2010), as its language clearly identified deportation as a likely outcome instead of a mere abstract possibility.

STATUTE: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 22-3210(d)(2), -3210(e)(1)(A), -3210(e)(2), -3608(c)

Tags:  8806  Attorney Discipline  Geary District  Montgomery District  Reno District  Sedgwick District  Weekly20190604 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

May 24, 2019 Digests

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Kansas Court of Appeals

Civil

ADMINISTRATIVE REMEDIES
BURCH V. KECK
PAWNEE DISTRICT COURT—REVERSED AND REMANDED
NO. 119,813—MAY 24, 2019

FACTS: Burch is a resident of the Sexual Predator Treatment Program in Larned. He filed a §1983 action claiming that SPTP officials violated his constitutional rights by seizing his property without due process. The Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services moved to dismiss, claiming that Burch failed to exhaust administrative remedies before filing suit. The district court agreed and the case was dismissed. Burch appealed.

ISSUE: (1) Duty to exhaust administrative remedies

HELD: Section 1983 does not contain a requirement that movants exhaust administrative remedies before bringing an action under the statute. K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 59-29a24 does require participants in SPTP to exhaust administrative remedies. The federal statute pre-empts the exhaustion requirement of K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 59-29a24. The case must be remanded for proceedings on Burch's original motion.

STATUTES: 28 U.S.C. § 1915, 42 U.S.C. § 1983, § 1997 (1)(B), § 1997e; K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 59-29a01, -29a02, -29a24

NEGLIGENCE—STATUTE OF REPOSE
DETERS V. NEMAHA-MARSHALL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION
NEMAHA DISTRICT COURT—AFFIRMED
NO. 119,200—MAY 24, 2019

FACTS: In 1994, the Deterses purchased from Nemaha-Marshall a GTS, a device which allowed them to safely connect a generator to household wiring. The GTS was installed by Nemaha-Marshall on the Deterses' electric pole. In 2000, the Deterses transferred all of their electricityincluding the GTSto a new house, shop, and implement shed on their property. Over the course of a year, the Deterses had to replace multiple appliances due to malfunctions. The Deterses claimed this was due to faulty wiring in the GTS. Alliance, their homeowners insurer, denied their claim, pointing to a lack of coverage for low voltage events. The Deterses sued both Nemaha-Marshall and Alliance for damages related to replacement appliances. Nemaha-Marshall moved for summary judgment on statute of repose grounds, since it had been at least 10 years since the GTS was connected to the Deterses' property. Alliance also moved for summary judgment, citing a lack of coverage in the Deterses' insurance policy. Both motions were granted and the Deterses appeal.

ISSUES: (1) Statute of repose; (2) insurance coverage; (3) bad faith investigation

HELD:The statute of repose clock begins running on the last act giving rise to the cause of action, not the last contact between the parties. Plaintiffs must bring their negligence action within 10 years of the original wrongful act. In this case, that act occurred in 2000 and the Deterses' claim is barred by the statute of repose. Much of the Deterses' argument is waived due to the failure to adequately brief the argument. To the extent that issues have been preserved, the district court correctly found that the homeowners' insurance policy provided no coverage for low voltage events. Alliance investigated this claim appropriately, especially since the Deterses proposed two different causes for the damage.

STATUTE: K.S.A. 60-513, -513(a)(4), -513(b)

criminal

criminal procedure—motions—sentences—statutes
state v. sheppard
wyandotte district court—affirmed
no. 119,454—may 24, 2019

FACTS: Sheppard was convicted in 2006 of second-degree murder and criminal possession of a firearm. Convictions were affirmed in 2009. Sheppard filed in 2017 a pro se motion to dismiss, reiterating the claim in his unsuccessful 2011 K.S.A. 60-1507 motion that he was arrested without probable cause because affidavit facts were false. District court denied Sheppard’s motion for leave to file the motion to dismiss out of time, finding no showing of excusable neglect. Sheppard appealed. He then filed a pro se motion to correct an illegal sentence, arguing that under the 2016 amendments to K.S.A. 21-6810, the district court improperly included a decayed 1994 Missouri juvenile adjudication in calculating criminal history. District court denied the motion. Sheppard appealed. Appeals consolidated.

ISSUES: (1) Excusable neglect; (2) motion to correct illegal sentence—decayed juvenile adjudications

HELD: A showing of excusable neglect under different statutes, cases and administrative regulations is discussed. Under facts in this case and circumstances surrounding the untimely filing, the appellate court found no abuse of the district court’s discretion in finding Sheppard failed to establish excusable neglect.

The 2016 amendments to K.S.A. 21-6810 do not apply to Sheppard’s case. Court of appeals panels have consistently held the 2016 amendments to the juvenile decay rules are substantive in nature, and the legislature has included no clear language that intended the 2016 amendments to operate retroactively. District court correctly included Sheppard’s 1994 juvenile residential burglary adjudication in the criminal history score.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 21-5807, -6803, -6803(e), -6810(d), -6810(e), 22-3208(4), -3504, -3504(3), 60-206(b)(1)(B), 60-206(b)(1)(B); K.S.A. 21-3715, -4710, -6810, 60-206(b), -260(b)(1), -1507; K.S.A. 21-4710 (Furse 1995)

criminal law—restitution—sentences—statutes
state v. Smith
shawnee district court—affirmed
no. 119,356—may 24, 2019

FACTS: Smith was convicted of possession of stolen property: a motorcycle that was damaged; and a scooter the Highway Patrol had towed, and then the towing company sold the scooter without first contacting the owner. Restitution order included $1365.77 for motorcycle repair, and $2141.93 replacement value for the scooter. Smith appealed, arguing insufficient evidence supported the amount of damage to the motorcycle. He also claimed that given the actions of law enforcement and the towing company there was no direct causal link between his crime and loss of the scooter, and argued the scooter owner should have been awarded fair market value rather than replacement cost.

ISSUES: (1) Restitution—sufficiency of the evidence; (2) restitution—causal link; (3) restitution—replacement value

HELD: District court found the motorcycle owner’s testimony about the condition of the motorcycle before and after it was stolen, and the need for the estimated repairs, was uncontroverted. Substantial competent evidence supported the district court’s findings.

As in State v. Arnett, 307 Kan. 648 (2018), but for Smith’s crime the scooter would not have been seized and towed. Applying Arnett, the district court’s factual determination of causation is accepted.

Under the restitution statute, K.S.A. 2015 Supp. 21-5801(a)(4), the district court was legally permitted to order replacement costs as restitution, and Smith agreed that the scooter owner’s loss exceeded $2000.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 21-6604(b)(1); K.S.A. 2015 Supp. 21-5801, -5801(a)(4); K.S.A. 21-6604(b)(1)

Tags:  8806  Nemaha District  Pawnee District  Shawnee District  Wyandotte District 

Share |
PermalinkComments (1)