Print Page | Contact Us | Sign In | Register
Appellate Court Digests
Blog Home All Blogs
Search all posts for:   

 

View all (182) posts »
 

June 12, 2020 Digests

Posted By Administration, Monday, June 15, 2020

Kansas Supreme Court

 

criminal 

attorneys and clients—criminal procedure—motions—sentencing
state v. adams
sedgwick district court—affirmed
no. 120,475—june 12, 2020

FACTS: District court allowed Adams to dismiss his appointed attorney and to proceed pro se at trial, resulting in plea agreement for guilty plea to criminal charges including premeditated first-degree murder. His request for reappointment of attorney for sentencing was granted. Sentence was imposed, which included a hard 50 sentence, following the plea agreement. Adams later filed motion to withdraw plea stating he was prepared to offer evidence from Iowa and Kansas departments of corrections of his unmedicated schizophrenia to show his plea was involuntary. He also filed K.S.A. 60-1507 motion alleging appointed counsel was ineffective because he did not address at sentencing whether Adams had an unmedicated mental health diagnosis, or have Adams undergo a mental health evaluation. District court held preliminary hearing with new appointed counsel and denied both motions. Adams appealed.

ISSUES: (1) Post-sentence motion to withdraw plea; (2) ineffective assistance of counsel at sentencing

HELD: District court properly concluded there was no manifest injustice because even if Adams had been allowed to present evidence regarding his previous mental health status, that diagnosis was not dispositive and the overall record would still conclusively show he was entitled to no relief.

            Under totality of circumstances, appointed counsel’s decision to forego a mental health evaluation of Adams does not constitute deficient representation when record shows Adams was sufficiently engaged in a rational, thoughtful, knowing way throughout the proceeding. There were no red flags in the record to suggest appointed counsel should have investigated Adams’s mental health. Adams’s reliance on “duty to investigate” in State v. Orr, 262 Kan. 312 (1997), is misplaced.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2019 Supp. 22-3210(d)(2); K.S.A. 22-3301(1), 60-1507

criminal law—criminal procedure—evidence—statutes
state v. dinkel
saline district court—remanded with directions; court of appeals—reversed
no. 113,705—june 12, 2020

FACTS: Jury convicted a school counselor of two counts of rape of 13-yr-old boy (K.H.). Dinkel appealed on claims related to her defense that the K.H. had raped and then blackmailed her into continuing sexual encounters. Dinkel argued the district court’s exclusion of this evidence violated evidentiary rules and her constitutional right to present a defense. Court of appeals affirmed in unpublished opinion, concluding the rape of a child has no mental culpability requirement thus Dinkel’s intent was irrelevant. Review granted.

ISSUE: K.S.A. 2012 Supp. 21-5503(a)(3) - Evidence relevant to voluntary act requirement

HELD: Court of Appeals erred in concluding that whether K.H. forced the sexual encounter was irrelevant. As defined in K.S.A. 2012 Supp. 21-5503(a)(3), rape of a child under age 14 requires a voluntary act on the part of the defendant. Dinkel’s claim that she was forcibly raped is relevant since the rape of Dinkel negates the voluntary act requirement of rape of a child under 14. Jurisdiction retained while case is remanded to district court for Van Cleave hearing to determine whether defense trial counsel was ineffective for failing to argue the State never established the voluntary act requirement.  

STATUTE: K.S.A. 2012 Supp. 21-5201, -5202, -5202(a), -5202(b), -5202(h), -5202(d), -5203(b), -5501(a), -5503(a)(3)

constitutional law—criminal procedure—preemption—statutes
state v. Garcia
johnson district court—affirmed; court of appeals—affirmed
no. 112,502—june 12, 2020

FACTS: Kansas Supreme Court reversed Garcia’s jury conviction for identity theft, holding prosecution based on the use of his W-4 form was preempted by the Immigration and Reform and Control Act (IRCA). State v. Garcia, 306 Kan. 1113 (2017). State filed writ of certiorari in this and companion cases. United States Supreme Court reversed and remanded the state supreme court’s judgment, holding state law prosecutions were not preempted by the IRCA.

ISSUE: PreemptionImmigration Reform and Control Act of 1986

HELD: Consistent with Kansas v. Garcia, 589 U.S. __ (2020), a Kansas prosecution for identity theft or making false information based on information a defendant provides on employment forms, with the exception of the I-9 form, is not preempted by the IRCA. Review of whether there was sufficient evidence of intent to defraud, and whether district court’s failure to give unanimity instruction was clearly erroneous, was improvidently granted. These issues are not addressed on the merits.

STATUTES: 8 U.S.C. § 1324a(b)(5); K.S.A. 2012 Supp. 21-6107

constitutional law—evidence—motions
state v. Glover
douglas district court—reversed; court of appeals—affirmed
no. 116,446—june 12, 2020

FACTS: District court granted Glover’s motion to suppress evidence obtained during a traffic stop, finding the officer lacked reasonable suspicion of illegal activity when he stopped the truck in violation of Fourth Amendment. Court of Appeals reversed. State v. Glover,  54 Kan. App. 2d 377 (2017). Kansas Supreme Court reversed and affirmed the district court’s suppression ruling. 308 Kan. 590 (2018). State’s writ of certiorari granted.

ISSUE: Fourth Amendmenttraffic stop

HELD: Consistent with Kansas v. Glover, 589 U.S. __ (2020), an investigative traffic stop made after running a vehicle’s license plate and learning the registered owner’s driver’s license has been revoked is reasonable under the Fourth Amendment if the officer lacks information negating an inference that the owner is driving the vehicle. Here, the stipulated facts reveal no information known by the deputy sufficient to rebut that reasonable inference. Kansas Supreme Court’s judgment is vacated and case is remanded to district court for further proceedings.

STATUTES: None

constitutional law—criminal procedure—preemption—statutes
state v. morales
johnson district court—affirmed; court of appeals—affirmed
no. 111,904—june 12 2020

FACTS: Kansas Supreme Court reversed Morales’ convictions for identity theft and making a false information, holding prosecution based on use of a Social Security number belonging to another person for employment was preempted by the Immigration and Reform and Control Act (IRCA). State v. Morales, 306 Kan. 1100 (2017). State filed writ of certiorari in this and companion cases. United States Supreme Court reversed and remanded the state supreme court’s judgment, holding state law prosecutions were not preempted by the IRCA.

ISSUE: PreemptionImmigration Reform and Control Act of 1986

HELD: Consistent with Kansas v. Garcia, 589 U.S. __ (2020), a Kansas prosecution for identity theft or making false information based on information a defendant provides on employment forms, with the exception of the I-9 form, is not preempted by the IRCA. Review of whether there was sufficient evidence of intent to defraud was improvidently granted. This issue is not addressed on the merits.

STATUTE: 8 U.S.C. § 1324a(b)(5)

criminal procedure—restitution—sentencing
state v. tucker
wyandotte district court—reversed
no. 119,242—june 12, 2020

FACTS: Tucker pled guilty to one count of capital murder and was sentenced to prison for life without parole. District court ordered payment of $5,000 in restitution without an explicit order for payment during Tucker’s incarceration, and acknowledged that restitution will never be paid. Tucker appealed.

ISSUE: Restitutionunworkable plan

HELD: Under circumstances in this case, district court abused its discretion by ordering an indigent criminal defendant sentenced to life in prison without possibility of parole to pay restitution even while recognizing the restitution would not be paid. State v. Holt, 305 Kan. 839 (2017), State v. Shank, 304 Kan. 89 (2016), and State v. Alcala,  301 Kan. 832 (2015), are distinguished. Restitution is the rule, and unworkability is the exception. Here, Tucker met the burden of establishing that the restitution plan was unworkable. Restitution order is reversed.

STATUTE: K.S.A. 2015 Supp. 21-6604(b)(1)

 

Kansas Court of Appeals

Civil

ADMINISTRATIVE LAW—JURISDICTION
BRUNGARDT V. KANSAS DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE
FINNEY DISTRICT COURT—REVERSED AND REMANDED
NO. 120,409—JUNE 12, 2020

FACTS: Corporal Kerley arrested Brungardt for driving under the influence. Corporal Kerley administered a breath test, following the mandatory procedures for the Intoxilyzer 9000 machine. The machine allows officers to fill out the required forms—including the DC-27 certification form—electronically. Because his blood-alcohol level exceeded legal limits, Brungardt's driver's license was administratively suspended by the Kansas Department of Revenue. In requesting an administrative hearing, Brungardt claimed, among other things, that the DC-27 form was invalid because it lacked an original, non-electronic signature. Although the hearing officer affirmed his suspension, the district court reversed during judicial review. The court found no flaws in Corporal Kerley's performance but ruled that Corporal Kerley had physically signed the machine when he created his electronic signature profile, before Brungardt's test was performed. K.S.A. 8-1002(b) establishes that certification of the DC-27 form occurs upon signing, and the district court reasoned that Corporal Kerley signed a blank page when he established his signature profile. The department appealed.

ISSUES: (1) Jurisdiction; (2) validity of electronic signature

HELD: Brungardt's petition for judicial review included his claim that the DC-27 form was invalid. Even though he didn't argue the exact grounds relied on by the district court when overturning the suspension, Brungardt gave adequate notice that the validity of the DC-27 was in question. This gave the district court jurisdiction to rule. "Signing" encompasses more activity than merely writing a name, and Kansas law recognizes electronic signatures. It is the intent of signing, not the physical form, which controls the effectiveness of the signature. Corporal Kerley followed the procedures of K.S.A. 8-1002(b) and affixed his signature when done. The district court improperly interpreted the statute and erred by reversing the suspension of Brungardt's driver's license.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2019 Supp. 8-1001, -1002(a), -1002(b), -1002(f); K.S.A. 77-614(b)(6)

Criminal

EQUAL PROTECTION—SEX CRIMES
STATE V. LITTLE
SEDGWICK DISTRICT COURT—AFFIRMED
NO. 120,214—JUNE 12, 2020

FACTS: Little was convicted of multiple, high-level felonies, including rape and aggravated criminal sodomy. These convictions meant that on top of his prison sentence, Little was given a lifetime term of postrelease supervision. Little appealed, arguing that this lifetime term of postrelease violated his right to equal protection.

ISSUE: (1) Equal protection

HELD: Equal protection requires that similarly situated people be treated alike. Little compares his postrelease term to the shorter terms given to people who are convicted of other serious felonies, like murder. But sex offenders are not similarly situated to people convicted of murder. Individuals convicted of certain sex offenses have much higher rates of recidivism, and the lifetime term of postrelease supervision serves the dual purpose of allowing rehabilitation while also protecting the public from future offenses.

STATUTE: K.S.A. 2008 Supp. 22-3717(d)(1)(G)

Tags:  administrative law  Attorneys and Clients  Constitutional Law  criminal law  criminal procedure  equal protection  evidence  jurisdiction  motions  preemption  restitution  sentencing  sex crimes  statutes 

Share |
Permalink | Comments (0)