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January 31, 2020 Digests

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, February 4, 2020

Kansas Supreme Court

criminal

constitutional law—appeals—appellate procedure—
criminal procedure—jurisdiction—statutes
state v. smith
sedgwick district court—court of appeals dismissal of the appeal is affirmed
no. 115,321—january 31, 2020

FACTS: In two separate cases, Smith pleaded guilty to refusing to submit to a test to determine presence of alcohol or drugs. Court of appeals consolidated Smith’s direct appeals. Relying on State v. Ryce, 303 Kan 899 (2016), decided while the consolidated appeal was pending, Smith argued the district court lacked jurisdiction to render the criminal judgments. In response, State argued the court of appeals lacked jurisdiction to consider a direct appeal from a guilty plea. Court of appeals dismissed Smith’s appeal for lack of subject matter jurisdiction without considering the merits of his Ryce claim.

ISSUE: (1) Appellate jurisdiction

HELD: Court of appeals did not err when it dismissed Smith’s appeal for lack of jurisdiction. K.S.A. 22-3602 is interpreted to resolve ambiguity, finding K.S.A. 22-3602(a) explicitly provides that a defendant cannot appeal a conviction after pleading guilty. K.S.A. 22-3504 allows appeals of sentences, not convictions, and federal caselaw allowing for direct appeals after guilty pleas in certain situations is inapplicable here. Smith’s convictions may be challenged in other ways, so notions of justice do not demand appellate jurisdiction. If he had still been serving his sentence, Smith could have filed a motion under K.S.A. 60-1507 to seek relief. He can also file a motion to withdraw his plea, and if denied, court of appeals has jurisdiction to consider an appeal from that denial.

STATUTES: K.S.A. 2018 Supp. 22-3601(a), -3602(a), 60-1507(a); K.S.A. 2014 Supp. 8-1025; K.S.A. 2013 Supp. 8-1025; K.S.A. 20-3001, 22-3210(d)(2), -3504, -3601, -3602, -3602(a), 60-1507, -1507; K.S.A. 62-1701 (Corrick)

 

Kansas Court of Appeals

criminal

appellate procedure—constitutional law—evidence—fourth amendment
state v. mckenna 
reno district court—affirmed
no. 119,431—january 31, 2020

FACTS: Officer checked on a sleeping or unconscious woman (McKenna) in driver’s seat in a parked car, and then arrested her on an outstanding warrant which was discovered once officer obtained McKenna’s name and ran a warrants check. McKenna was charged with possession of methamphetamine and possession of a stimulant, based on evidence found in her clothing during booking. McKenna filed motion to suppress, arguing the officer unconstitutionally detained her without reasonable suspicion she was committing a crime. District court denied the motion, finding officer’s actions were justified as a welfare check. McKenna appealed the denial of her motion to suppress. Parties submitted supplemental briefing on issue of whether the public safety stop exceeded its lawful scope when officer asked for McKenna’s name and ran a warrants check.

ISSUE: (1) Public safety stop

HELD: Under circumstances of this case, officer did not exceed scope of a public safety stop by asking for McKenna’s name, getting a verbal response, and checking that name locally for warrants. Three-part test in State v. Gonzales, 36 Kan.App.2d 446 (2006), is satisfied in this case. Record shows officer’s actions were motivated by a desire to render aid or assistance rather than to investigate criminal activity.  

STATUTE: K.S.A. 22-2402(1)

Tags:  appeals  appellate procedure  constitutional law  criminal procedure  evidence  Fourth Amendment  jurisdiction  Reno District Court  Sedgwick District Court  statutes 

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