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Microsoft Quick Tip: Unformatted Copy/Paste

Posted By Danielle M. Hall, Tuesday, December 17, 2019

Sometimes you need to copy and paste data from one document to another. Unfortunately, copy and paste may place unwanted formatting and styles into your new document. To avoid the unwanted formatting and styles, try pasting using the “text only” option:

  1. Copy the content you want to place from your document.
  2. Click where you want to paste the content in the new document.
  3. Select the  Keep Text Only option.

Should you forget to select the Keep Text Only option, you can clear the formatting by using tools in  Styles group under the Home tab of the Ribbon in Word.

 

  1. Highlight the text for which you want to clear the formatting.
  2. Click on the Home tab in the Ribbon.
  3. Click the down arrow next to your Styles to select the More option.
  4. Click Clear Formatting.
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Click image for full size

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Tags:  Author: Danielle M. Hall  copy  formatting  keep text only  Microsoft  paste  styles 

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Microsoft Word Quick Tip—Use AutoCorrect to Insert Text

Posted By Danielle M. Hall, Tuesday, May 21, 2019

You might have noticed that Microsoft Word has an AutoCorrect function. If turned on, you might even get slightly annoyed with some of the built-in auto corrections. For instance, if you have ever intentionally typed “(c)” and Word changed it to the copyright symbol, chances are you have questioned why you should keep the AutoCorrect function on—I know I have. Lately, however, I have started using the AutoCorrect function within Word in a completely different way.  Since making this change, AutoCorrect has become a pretty amazing tool to use while I am drafting documents in Word.

What have I been doing? I have been using AutoCorrect to replace shorthand words, characters, and/or acronyms as I type with complete words or short phrases that I commonly use. For example, when I type “/dmh" this gets replaced automatically with my full name.  Another example I have set up is this: if I type “/KRPC” it autocorrects to Kansas Rules of Professional Responsibility. You may have noticed that I strategically placed a forward slash in the acronym that I am using to replace text with.  I did that, because there are times where I may want to keep the use of the acronym available to me within my documents.  You need to keep this in mind when creating your shortcuts. Also, once you have added a shortcut to your AutoCorrect library, it will work within PowerPoint, Outlook, Excel and OneNote, since the library is shared across Microsoft Office.

If you want to try using the AutoCorrect feature more actively in your drafting, here is how you set up your shortcut entries:

PC Instructions

  • Click the File tab.
  • Click Options.
  • Click Proofing.
  • Click AutoCorrect Options, and then Click the AutoCorrect tab.
  • Select Replace text as you type check box, if it is not already selected.
  • Under Replace, type your shortcut character, word, or acronym.
  • Under With, type the word you want the shortcut replaced with.
  • Click OK.
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Mac Instructions

  • Click Word at top left of the menu bar.
  • Click Preferences
  • Click AutoCorrect under "Authoring and Proofing Tools"
  • Select Replace text as you type check box, if it is not already selected.
  • Under Replace, type your shortcut character, word, or acronym.
  • Under With, type the word you want the shortcut replaced with.
  • Press Return.
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Tags:  acronyms  Author: Danielle M. Hall  autocorrect  insert text  LPM  Microsoft  microsoft word  MS Word  tech tip 

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Microsoft Word Quick Tip – Uncheck Ignore Words in UPPERCASE

Posted By Danielle M. Hall, Tuesday, March 5, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, March 5, 2019
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Have you ever noticed that the default setting in Microsoft Word is to ignore words in uppercase? As a result, the correct spelling functionality will ignore anything in uppercase such as headings and titles. There is a way, however, to change this setting. Here is how you do it:

  • Under the File tab, click Options.
  • Click Proofing.
  • Under “When correcting spelling in Microsoft Office programs,” uncheck Ignore words in UPPERCASE.
  • Click OK to save.

Once you have saved this change in your settings, anything you type in all uppercase will now get spell checked!

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Tags:  Author: Danielle M. Hall  Microsoft  Microsoft Word  spell check 

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To Scan or Not to Scan a Document

Posted By Danielle M. Hall, Tuesday, September 11, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, October 16, 2018
By Danielle M. Hall, Deputy Disciplinary Administrator, Office of the Disciplinary Administrator's Office

On multiple occasions I have seen lawyers print a document, walk over to the scanner and scan the document to create a PDF. Sure, this is relatively easy to do; however, when you scan the document in this manner, what you are actually doing is creating an image of that document rather than creating a true digital document.

There are clear downsides to an image-only PDF. For instance, you lose search capabilities, because the image-only PDF contains just the photographed images of pages without the underlying text layer. Additionally, their text usually cannot be modified or marked up for the purposes of editing. The only way to correct these issues is through using an OCR (Optical Character Recognition) application. Unfortunately, if you only have Adobe Reader, you won’t be able to perform this function. You must have Adobe Acrobat or some other tool to OCR text from a scanned document. The other issue with OCR is that, depending on the quality of the image, or the recognizability of the writing, it may not be 100% accurate.

Instead of scanning a document into an image-only PDF, I highly recommend creating “true” or digitally created PDFs by using software such as Microsoft Word or Excel. For instance, if you have created a document in Word, converting it to a true PDF is just as easy as creating an image-only PDF, without even having to walk to the scanner.

Here are the steps for converting a Word document:

  • Click File, then click Save As.
  • In the File Name box, enter a name for the file, if you haven’t already.
  • In the Save as type dropdown list, click PDF.
  • Click Save.

You can also create a PDF in Word by using the print to pdf option, following these steps:

  • Click File, then click Print.
  • Under the Printer option, select Microsoft Print to PDF.
  • Click Print.

Stayed tuned to next week’s Tech Tip for instructions on how to convert other documents, including Excel Files.

Tags:  Microsoft  Microsoft Word  PDF  save to PDF  Tech Tip 

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Microsoft Word Quick Tip: Keyboard Shortcuts for § and ¶

Posted By Danielle M. Hall, Tuesday, July 31, 2018

By Danielle M. Hall, Kansas Bar Association 

Most of us use Microsoft Word frequently in our day-to-day work, however, if I had to bet, I would say that most of us are probably not taking advantage of keyboard shortcuts to work more efficiently when creating documents.

If you have ever created a document which included the § and ¶ symbols, you know that it can be cumbersome to insert these special characters in Word. Typically, you would need to:

  1. Click the Insert tab
  2. Click Symbol
  3. Click More Symbols
  4. Select the Special Characters tab
  5. Choose the special character you want to insert, and finally select Insert

Constantly taking your hands off the keyboard in this manner to point and click with your mouse can add up to a lot of wasted time. So, what if I told you that there are shortcuts to all this clicking with a mouse?

First, if you are using a PC you will want to make sure you have the number lock enabled on your keyboard, and that you are using the numeric keyboard on the right. The shortcut on a PC for § is Alt+21, and for ¶ is Alt+20. For Mac users, your shortcut for § is Option+6, and for ¶ is Option+7. It is that simple!

PC Mac
§ Alt+21 Option+6
Alt+20 Option+7

Tags:  Keyboard shortcuts  Microsoft  Microsoft Word  symbols 

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